100% plastic-free: Sainsbury’s will replace plastic stems and adhesive from cotton buds

100% plastic-free: Sainsbury’s will replace plastic stems and adhesive from cotton buds

 

London, 2017-Feb-23 — /EPR Retail News/ — Sainsbury’s has become the first retailer to publicly commit to the removal of 100% of plastics in its cotton buds. The move means the adhesive, which holds the cotton bud to the stem, will be replaced by a fully biodegradable substance that – unlike common strong adhesives – will be 100% free from plastic. The retailer is already in talks to find a suitable replacement adhesive.

  • New design will replace the plastic stems and adhesive from cotton buds
  • Retailer is first to publicly commit to finding a biodegradable version of this bathroom staple
  • Sainsbury’s to share details of new biodegradable adhesive with others to encourage further uptake
  • Retailer is microbead free all own brand products

At present common adhesives used on cotton buds are not biodegradable, and Sainsbury’s is the first retailer to pledge publicly to introduce a new biodegradable glue. What’s more, once a practical solution has been found, Sainsbury’s will share the details of the adhesive amongst the industry so that other producers can choose to make the switch.

The move comes after the retailer announced its plans to remove the plastic stems in the products, replacing them with a biodegradable paper option. Sainsbury’s has committed to changing the stem in 2017, and hopes to phase in the new biodegradable adhesive at the same time.  This would mean that the buds would be 100% biodegradable.

Each year, Sainsbury’s sells over 300 million own-brand cotton buds, with the revised products expected to remove over 50 tonnes of plastic from production.

While cotton buds are not designed to be flushed away, despite on-pack warnings, many end up in the sea as consumers flush them down the toilet rather than disposing of them in household waste.  The Marine Conservation Society’s 2016 Big Beach Clean Report found that the number of cotton bud sticks found on UK beaches had doubled since 2012, from an average of 11 to 24 for every 100 metres. This move means neither plastic stems nor the plastic based adhesive will end up in the sea.

In addition to these changes, Sainsbury’s also plans to increase the prominence of the ‘do not flush’ warnings on the front of cotton bud packs, introducing a new industry-standard marking to help advise customers.

Speaking of the switch Judith Batchelar, Director of Sainsbury’s Brand, said: “We’re always looking for ways to make our products more sustainable and switching to a biodegradable adhesive to our own brand cotton buds is a great example, furthering our promise to remove the plastic stems. Openness and sharing within the industry is going to be key in driving the uptake of sustainable choices, which is why we are committed  to share the new biodegradable glue once it’s developed. This is more than making a competitive product, it’s doing what’s fundamentally right for the environment.”

Dr Clare Cavers, Research Officer for environmental charity Fidra, commented: “Cotton buds should always be bagged and binned but we know that many people still flush them away. Education is key and these changes from Sainsbury’s will have a huge impact on marine health, especially with their pledge to share the revised formula with competitors.  It’s great to see this sustainable way of thinking continuing to prevail.”

Natalie Fee, founder of plastic pollution campaign group City to Sea, added: “Preventing plastics from reaching the ocean is essential for ensuring the health of our marine wildlife and also from stopping plastics entering the food chain. It’s great that retailers have agreed to switch the stick, but this move from Sainsbury’s goes even further to protect our oceans.”

The move is part of Sainsbury’s continued drive to heighten sustainability across all areas of its business, with the retailer previously setting out a number of public commitments within its Sustainability Plan.  Included within this is a pledge to source sustainable fish whilst protecting marine ecosystems. Last year Sainsbury’s was acknowledged with the ‘Seafood Champion Award for Leadership’ at the Seafood Summit, recognising leadership by bringing together seafood stakeholders to improve sustainability. Elsewhere the retailer a supporter of projects like the Global Ghost Gear Initiative, which works to protect our oceans by tackling the issue of lost or abandoned fishing gear.

Press Enquiries:
Email: press_office@sainsburys.co.uk
Tel: 020 7695 7295.

Source: Sainsbury

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UN’s 17 sustainable development goals and what Sainsbury’s can do to get involved

LONDON, 2015-9-28 — /EPR Retail News/ — You might have seen the ‘Global Goals’ being talked about this week and would like to know what Sainsbury’s and our customers and colleagues can do to get involved.

On September 25th 2015, the United Nations General Assembly will gather and commit to 17 sustainable development goals. These goals will take us into the next 15 years of international development and aim to end poverty, tackle inequality and reduce the impact of climate change.  This will no doubt have an effect on people and companies around the world to make a positive impact on everyone.

Our values are at the heart of everything we do and make a key point of difference for our business. The new Sustainable Development Goals are well aligned to our own business values and our 20×20 sustainability plan, including our environmental and sourcing commitments, as well supporting our communities and our credentials as a good employer.

I’m really proud of our work that supports the new goals, which spans from The Fair Development Fund which was set up with Comic Relief in 2007. This is a unique partnership that combines Comic Relief’s expertise in awarding grants with our experience and knowledge in farming and food to help producers in developing countries thrive. This means that farmers and workers have a better chance of building a sustainable income and brighter future for themselves, their families and their communities.  And all the way through to project such as one in Kenya which is focused on improving water efficiencies during production, developing smallholder-specific flower production and improving women workers’ health education and provision. Previously used in Bangladesh, this ‘peer to peer’ model identifies topics specific to the work force and has proven results in reducing absenteeism, which in turn impacts income.

We believe that the business case for sustainability has never been stronger. Through our customers, colleagues and supply chains we will continue to focus on our sustainability commitments and take action to support the goals.

If you’d like to find out more about the Global Goals, visit the campaign site http://www.globalgoals.org/

By Judith Batchelar, Director of Sainsbury’s brand 

 

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UN's 17 sustainable development goals and what Sainsbury’s can do to get involved

UN’s 17 sustainable development goals and what Sainsbury’s can do to get involved

Sainsbury’s Brand Director Judith Batchelar awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Honours list

Director of Sainsbury’s Brand has been awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Honours list, published today

LONDON, 2015-6-15 — /EPR Retail News/ — Judith has been Director of Sainsbury’s brand for 10 years and is responsible for all aspects of Sainsbury’s product offer – from policy formation on aspects such as Animal Welfare, Ethical and Sustainable Sourcing, through to Product Technology, Product Development, Product Safety, and Packaging.

Judith Batchelar OBE said: “I am absolutely delighted and feel truly honoured by this recognition. I’m very proud of what we’ve achieved at Sainsbury’s so this is testament to the work of my team and everything we’re doing to drive innovation and quality for our customers. We’re committed to our values and sourcing, as well as supporting our farmers and always looking for new, sustainable ways of working.”

Judith has worked in the food and drink industry for over 30 years and is a Biochemist and Registered Nutritionist. She has a particular interest and expertise in building resilient and sustainable farming and food systems.

Prior to Sainsbury’s, Judith held a similar role at Safeway, spent twelve years in the Food Division at Marks & Spencer, most latterly driving their Health and Well-being strategy, and prior to this worked in manufacturing for Mars and Bass.

In addition to her work at Sainsbury’s, Judith sits on the Executive Board of the Prince’s Accounting for Sustainability Project, the Board of Trustees for Farm Africa and The Matt Hampson Foundation, is a member of the Institute of Food Science and Technology (IFST), and a fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.  She is also an ambassador for the Woodland Trust and Co Chairs the Governments Industrial Leadership Council working on the implementation of the UK’s first Agri-Tech Strategy.

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Sainsbury’s Brand Director Judith Batchelar awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Honours list

Sainsbury’s Brand Director Judith Batchelar awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Honours list

UK’s foremost investigator of labour exploitation GLA to deliver bespoke training for the Sainsbury’s product suppliers

LONDON, 2014-12-18 — /EPR Retail News/ — The GLA has teamed up with Sainsbury’s in a ground-breaking partnership between the UK’s foremost investigator of labour exploitation and the supermarket to deliver bespoke training for its product suppliers.

The training focuses on assisting Sainsbury’s suppliers in identifying whether hidden exploitative practices exist at the farms, pack houses, processing plants and factories throughout the global supply-chain.

This first of its kind training pilots this week with GLA officers providing a package that has been developed to meet the specific requirements of the Sainsbury’s product suppliers.

GLA Chief Executive Paul Broadbent said:

“We are delighted to have forged this industry leading agreement and to work alongside Sainsbury’s in this way.

“There is a real commitment and desire on both sides to identify any practice that subjects workers to exploitation.

“Such activity, by its very nature, is kept hidden by its perpetrators as far as possible and is difficult to detect but there are indicators to look out for and these are what we will be teaching Sainsbury’s product suppliers to spot.

“By raising awareness through training, Sainsbury’s is showing a determination to identify any issues of concern. I applaud them for this and will continue to work alongside them to tackle it.”

This new training arrangement builds upon the GLA’s Supplier/Retail Protocol that was launched in October 2013 by Home Secretary Theresa May.

The protocol was a commitment from major retailers and suppliers to share information and intelligence with the authority about suspicions and wrongdoings with confidence.

It is a key part of the GLA’s ongoing programme to raise awareness of worker exploitation within the specified regulated sector of agriculture, horticulture, shellfish gathering and all associated processing and packaging.

Judith Batchelar, Director of Sainsbury’s Brand adds:

“We’re proud to have carried out the first pilot training for our suppliers in partnership with GLA, we hope this takes us a step further in tackling hidden labour exploitation.

“Modern slavery within global supply chains is a serious issue and it is a priority of ours to work with our suppliers to address it.”

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UK’s foremost investigator of labour exploitation GLA to deliver bespoke training for the Sainsbury’s product suppliers

UK’s foremost investigator of labour exploitation GLA to deliver bespoke training for the Sainsbury’s product suppliers

Fair Development Fund combines Comic Relief’s expertise in awarding grants with Sainsbury’s experience and knowledge in farming and food to help producers in developing countries thrive

Fair Development Fund by Comic Relief and Sainsbury’s is a unique partnership that combines Comic Relief’s expertise in awarding grants with Sainsbury’s 145 years of experience and knowledge in farming and food to help producers in developing countries thrive.

LONDON, 2014-11-27 — /EPR Retail News/ — This means that farmers and workers have a better chance of building a sustainable income and brighter future for themselves, their families and their communities.

£4 million has been committed since it started in 2007. The funding provides long-term economic, environmental and social support to farmers and their communities within the Sainsbury’s supply chain.

Judith Batchelar, Director of Sainsbury’s Brand said: “Fair Development Fund is a great way of bringing together Sainsbury’s and Comic Relief to create a partnership that benefits thousands of famers and their communities. What’s really unique about the partnership is the valuable time and expertise offered by Sainsbury’s.  This hands-on approach really improves the fund, and extends how the farmers benefit.”

“I’ve seen first-hand what a difference our investment in farmers and small producers around the world can have. The fund not only benefits the farmers, it extends out to their families and communities which is an important factor to making a sustainable difference in our supply chain, and having a positive impact in the areas we source from.”

Richard Graham, Head of International Grants, Comic Relief, said: “Fair Development Fund is unique as it brings together the expertise of Sainsbury’s and Comic Relief, which producers really value. The producers overseas get fantastic help and support from Sainsbury’s so they better understand the demands of the market. They get Comic Relief’s extensive knowledge of funding small and medium enterprises, together with long term funding.

As a result, the Fund really helps businesses to thrive and grow, deliver real benefit to poor producers and make sure their work is environmentally sustainable.”

Malawian cotton growers

Through the Fair Development Fund £250,000 has been committed to help 7,800 cotton farmers in Malawi work towards producing sustainable Better Cotton Initiative (BCI) cotton for our use over the next three years. The aim is that producer income will also increase by 35% over the three years through good agricultural, environmental, and social practices.

How we’ve helped:

Coffee Sustainability Project, Uganda

This joint initiative between coffee roaster Matthew Algie, ethical trading organisation Twin and the Gumutindo Coffee Cooperative will improve farming practices in Uganda for the benefit of local communities and develop top quality coffee for customers in Sainsbury’s cafes.

Tanzanian tea farmers

The Fair Development Fund has allocated £250,000 to a project in Tanzania involving 11,000 small scale tea famers. The main objectives are to rehabilitate a growing area and to provide training to the farmers on the latest good agricultural and environmental practices.

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Fair Development Fund combines Comic Relief's expertise in awarding grants with Sainsbury's experience and knowledge in farming and food to help producers in developing countries thrive

Fair Development Fund combines Comic Relief’s expertise in awarding grants with Sainsbury’s experience and knowledge in farming and food to help producers in developing countries thrive

 

Sainsbury’s Blanc de Blancs NV voted the best supermarket Champagne in the annual Which? Champagne and sparkling wine taste test

We are proud to announce that our own brand Blanc de Blancs NV Champagne has been voted the best supermarket Champagne in the annual Which? Champagne and sparkling wine taste test.

LONDON, 2014-11-21 — /EPR Retail News/ — Tasted by a panel of experts, Sainsbury’s Blanc de Blancs was described as  having ‘tantalising biscuit and brioche-like aromas’; being ‘savoury and rich with tones of ‘honey on buttered toast’; and ‘well made with a stylish balance of acidity and sweetness’.

With the highest score awarded of 80%, Sainsbury’s own brand Champagne, priced at £22.50, was awarded higher points than any other retailer, including Tesco, Waitrose and M&S, as well as expensive well-known brands such as Laurent Perrier Brut Champagne (£38), Veuve Clicquot Ponsardin Yellow Label Champagne NV (£37) and Moët & Chandon Brut Imperial Champagne (£33).

Sainsbury’s Blanc de Blancs NV was created by Sandrine Logette-Jardin, winemaker at Duval Leroy, one of the few Champagne houses to remain family owned.  Sainsbury’s was the first supermarket to introduce its own brand Champagne and has a relationship with Duval-Leroy that has lasted for more than 30 years.

“We pride ourselves on the quality of our Champagne and we know our customers appreciate the superb range of own brand Champagne that is available in our stores” said Judith Batchelar, Director of Sainsbury’s Brand.  “This result is testimony to the value of working closely with expert suppliers to ensure we are delivering the very best to our customers – and that’s never more important than at Christmas time.  I’ll certainly be sharing a bottle or two with family and friends in celebration.”

Sainsbury’s Blanc de Blancs is not only a Which?  ‘Best Buy’ bubbly, but also the best priced, making it the top choice for Christmas fizz this year.

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Sainsbury’s Blanc de Blancs NV voted the best supermarket Champagne in the annual Which? Champagne and sparkling wine taste test

Sainsbury’s Blanc de Blancs NV voted the best supermarket Champagne in the annual Which? Champagne and sparkling wine taste test