Santa Fe Importers recalls pork salami products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials

WASHINGTON, 2017-Dec-13 — /EPR Retail News/ — Santa Fe Importers, Inc. a Long Beach, Calif. establishment, is recalling approximately 143 pounds of pork salami products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically metal shavings, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today (Dec. 12, 2017).

The pork salami items were produced on Aug. 3, 2017. The following products are subject to recall: 

  • 3.5 to 4.0-lbs. random weight of plastic wrapped packages of “MARISA PREMIUM QUALITY GENOA SALAMI ITALIAN BRAND,” with a packaging date of Sept. 14, 2017 and a lot code of 257-100161 in the upper right hand corner.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 4118” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in California.

The problem was discovered after the company received a complaint from their retail customer and notified FSIS on Dec. 11, 2017.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Vincent Passanisi, president, at (562) 437-7775. Media with questions about the recall can contact Jorge Endara, general manager, at (562) 437-7775.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Contact:
Congressional and Public Affairs
Autumn Canaday
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

USDA provides users with new information on food safety recalls with the update on its FoodKeeper app

WASHINGTON, 2017-Aug-31 — /EPR Retail News/ — The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today (August 29, 2017) announced new updates to its popular FoodKeeper application that will provide users with new information on food safety recalls. The app has been updated so users can choose to receive automatic notifications when food safety recalls are announced by USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

In the update posted to the Google Play and iTunes stores, users can select to receive information on food safety recalls immediately when they’re announced or select to receive them daily or weekly. The update also adds instructional videos on proper handling and storage of food, and expands the list of food and beverage products from about 400 to more than 500 items.

“This is a great way for the public to stay informed when food is recalled,” said Acting Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety Carmen Rottenberg. “The FoodKeeper app is a very handy and easy to use tool; and it reflects USDA’s commitment to provide the public with information and knowledge to help them make informed decisions.”

The FoodKeeper app was developed by FSIS in partnership with Cornell University and the Food Marketing Institute, as a tool to help reduce food waste and improve public health by sharing storage methods that extend the shelf life of the foods and beverages in American homes. It now offers specific storage timelines for the refrigerator, freezer and pantry, for more than 500 products, including various types of baby food, dairy products and eggs, meat, poultry, produce, seafood and more. Since it was launched in April 2015, it has been downloaded nearly 150,000 times.

“These updates to the FoodKeeper are just one more example of FSIS’ commitment to reducing the rates of foodborne illness nationally,” said Rottenberg. “We want to make sure the valuable recall information FSIS and FDA publish is available to as many Americans as possible. With the expansion of products covered in the apps database, this app is helpful to any type of consumer, and I encourage anyone who hasn’t already done so, to download and begin using the FoodKeeper app.”

With the FoodKeeper application, each user can:

  • Find specific storage timelines for the refrigerator, freezer and pantry, depending on the nature of the product;
  • Learn cooking tips and methods for various types of meat, poultry and seafood products;
  • Note in their device’s calendar when products were purchased and receive notifications when they are nearing the end of their recommended storage date;
  • Submit a question to USDA using the ‘Ask Karen’ feature of the application. ‘Ask Karen’ is USDA’s 24/7 virtual representative. The system provides information about preventing foodborne illness, safe food handling and storage, and safe preparation of meat, poultry and egg products;
  • Submit items not included in the database for consideration in future updates;
  • Receive information on food safety recalls immediately when they’re announced or select to receive them daily or weekly.

For those that do not have access to a smartphone, the FoodKeeper app can also be accessed at FoodSafety.gov/FoodKeeper.

NOTE: Access news releases and other information at FSIS’ website at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Follow FSIS on Twitter at twitter.com/usdafoodsafety or in Spanish at: twitter.com/usdafoodsafe_es.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.

Contact:

FSIS Office of Public Affairs and Consumer Education
Press (202) 720-9113
Consumer Inquiries (888) 674-6854

Source: USDA

USDA offers food safety this busy fall season

WASHINGTON, 2017-Aug-16 — /EPR Retail News/ — During the busy fall season, whether you’re preparing a packed lunch for your child, a weeknight dinner for the family, or a tailgate feast for the whole crew, make sure you prevent foodborne illness by following USDA’s four steps to food safety: Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill.

Clean: Wash your hands and cooking surfaces before and after handling food. Wash fruits and vegetables before eating, cutting, or cooking. Make sure lunch boxes and coolers are clean before packing.

Separate: Avoid cross contamination. Don’t let raw meat, poultry, or egg products come in contact with fruits, vegetables, or prepared foods. Never put cooked food on a plate or tray that held raw meat or poultry.

Cook: When cooking, use a food thermometer to make sure food reaches a safe minimum internal temperature needed to destroy harmful bacteria. Cook raw beef, pork, lamb and veal steaks, chops, roasts, and fish to a minimum internal temperature of 145°F and let them rest for three minutes before eating. When cooking raw ground beef, pork, lamb, and veal, make sure the meat reaches a minimum internal temperature of 160°F. Egg dishes should also be cooked to a safe minimum internal temperature of 160°F. All poultry should be cooked to a safe minimum internal temperature of 165°F.

Chill: When packing food, use an insulated lunchbox or cooler and at least two cold sources, such as freezer packs. Discard any perishable foods that were left at room temperature longer than two hours (one hour in temperatures above 90°F).

Lunch Packing Tips

  • If the lunch contains perishable food items like luncheon meats, eggs, cheese, or yogurt, make sure to pack it with at least two cold sources, such as freezer packs. Harmful bacteria multiply rapidly so perishable food transported without a cold source won’t stay safe long.
  • Frozen juice boxes or water can also be used as freezer packs. Freeze these items overnight and use with at least one other freezer pack. By lunchtime, the liquids should be thawed and ready to drink.
  • If packing a hot lunch, like soup, chili, or stew, use an insulated container to keep it hot. Fill the container with boiling water, let stand for a few minutes, empty, and then put in the piping hot food. Tell children to keep the insulated container closed until lunchtime to keep the food at 140°F or above.
  • If packing a child’s lunch the night before, parents should leave it in the refrigerator overnight. The meal will stay cold longer because everything will be refrigerator temperature when it is placed in the lunchbox.

Eating and Disposal Tips

  • Teach children to properly wash their hands before eating lunch. If running water isn’t available, pack disposable wipes for cleaning hands before and after eating.
  • After lunch, children should discard all leftover food and used food packaging.
  • Clean lunch boxes thoroughly each night with warm soapy water or a disinfectant wipe.

Consumers can learn more about key food safety practices at Foodsafety.gov, by following @USDAFoodSafety on Twitter, and by liking Facebook.com/FoodSafety.gov. Consumers with questions about food safety can call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or chat live with a food safety specialist at AskKaren.gov, available from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, in English or Spanish.

If you have questions about storage times for food or beverages, download USDA’s FoodKeeper application for Android and iOS devices.

Contact:
Food Safety Education Staff
Press (202) 720-9113
Consumer Inquiries (888) 674-6854

Source: USDA

USDA offers home cooks tips on food safety

WASHINGTON, 2017-Apr-19 — /EPR Retail News/ — With spring renewal upon us, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service invites home cooks to gain kitchen confidence by refreshing their perspectives on food safety. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that each year approximately 48 million Americans suffer from foodborne illnesses, leading to 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths. Many of these illnesses can be prevented by changing behaviors in the kitchen and gaining a little kitchen confidence.

What is kitchen confidence?

Kitchen confidence is simply the confidence in your ability to safely prepare delicious meals for your loved ones and yourself. Even armed with grandma’s best recipes, the most experienced cooks can unknowingly make food safety mistakes that can make people sick. So this spring, be confident in your food safety skills by accessing the following resources: FoodSafety.gov, the Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888MPHotline and the FoodKeeper app.

Throughout the spring you’ll find blogs, roasting charts, storage guidance, and the latest news on food recalls at FoodSafety.gov. You’ll also have access to a wealth of expertise to help tackle any food preparation challenge.

Among the many tools available on FoodSafety.gov is the FoodKeeper. It’s available on the website, and as a mobile app for smartphones and tablets. With more than 100,000 downloads onto Android and iOS devices, the FoodKeeper is quickly establishing itself as the go-to quick reference guide for safe food storage. Available in English, Spanish, and Portuguese, the FoodKeeper helps limit food waste by providing storage information on more than 400 food items, including produce, baby food, dairy products, eggs, meat, poultry, and seafood. The FoodKeeper also offers customizable notifications that sync with smartphone calendars to remind users when it is time to use, freeze or dispose of products.

Protecting families from foodborne illness is one of the Food Safety and Inspection Services’ primary goals. Our food safety specialists on our Meat and Poultry Hotline can personally answer your food safety questions on weekdays year-round. The hotline receives more than 50,000 calls annually. This toll-free telephone service, which began July 1, 1985, helps prevent foodborne illness by answering questions about the safe storage, handling and preparation of meat, poultry and egg products.

This spring, get that kitchen confidence back. Visit FoodSafety.gov.

Consumers can learn more about key food safety practices by following FSIS @USDAFoodSafety on Twitter or www.Facebook.com/FoodSafety.gov on Facebook. Consumers with questions about food safety can call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or chat live with a food safety specialist in English or Spanish at AskKaren.gov, available from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST, Monday through Friday.

Contact:

Food Safety Education Staff
Press: (202) 720-9113
Consumer Inquiries: (888) 674-6854

Source: USDA

USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service shares food safety tips for winter storm impacted northeast states

WASHINGTON, 2017-Mar-15 — /EPR Retail News/ — As a winter storm impacts northeast states, USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service shares food safety tips to keep in mind when preparing for a weather emergency.

During Snow and Ice Storms:

  • During a snowstorm, do not place perishable food out in the snow. Outside temperatures can vary and food can be exposed to unsanitary conditions and animals. Instead, make ice by filling buckets or cans with water and leave them outside to freeze. Use this ice to help keep food cold in the freezer, refrigerator or coolers.

Steps to follow if the power goes out:

  • Keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. A refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4 hours if the door is kept closed. A full freezer will hold its temperature for about 48 hours (24 hours if half-full).
  • Place meat and poultry to one side of the freezer or on a tray to prevent cross contamination of thawing juices.
  • Use dry or block ice to keep the refrigerator as cold as possible during an extended power outage. Fifty pounds of dry ice should keep a fully-stocked 18-cubic-feet freezer cold for two days.  

Steps to follow after a weather emergency:

  • Check the temperature inside of your refrigerator and freezer. Discard any perishable food (such as meat, poultry, seafood, eggs or leftovers) that has been above 40°F for two hours or more.
  • Check each item separately. Throw out any food that has an unusual odor, color or texture or feels warm to the touch.
  • Check frozen food for ice crystals. The food in your freezer that partially or completely thawed may be safely refrozen if it still contains ice crystals or is 40°F or below.
  • Never taste a food to decide if it’s safe.
  • When in doubt, throw it out.

FSIS’ YouTube video “Food Safety During Power Outages” has instructions for keeping frozen and refrigerated food safe. The publication “Preparing for a Weather Emergency” can be downloaded and printed for reference during an emergency. FSIS also has an infographic covering what to do before, during and after a power outage.

If you have questions about food safety during severe weather, or any other food safety topics, can call the USDA Meat & Poultry Hotline at 1-888MPHotline or chat live with a food safety specialist at AskKaren.gov. These services are available from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, in English and Spanish. Answers to frequently asked question can also be found 24/7 at AskKaren.gov.

SOURCE: USDA FSIS

Food Safety Education Staff
Press (202) 720-9113
Consumer Inquiries (888) 674-6854

151 Pounds of Beef Jerky Products Recalled by Dos Hermanos, Inc.

WASHINGTON, 2017-Mar-06 — /EPR Retail News/ — Dos Hermanos, Inc., a Bedford Park, Ill. establishment, is recalling approximately 151 pounds of beef jerky products that were produced without the benefit of federal inspection, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today (March 1, 2017).

It is not known when or under what conditions the beef jerky items were produced. The following products are subject to recall: 

  • 8-oz packages of “Carne Seca Beef Jerky: Chihuas Natural.”

The products subject to recall do not bear the federal mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri between the dates of Oct. 26, 2016 through Feb. 23, 2017.

The problem was discovered by a compliance investigator with the State of Kansas.  The investigator observed three pounds of beef jerky product in commerce that did not have any state or federal marks of inspection and notified FSIS.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers and members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Carlos Barraza, Owner of Dos Hermanos, Inc., at (773) 703-5558.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Contact:

Congressional and Public Affairs
Allie Ryan
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

Product recall: Ukrop’s Homestyle Foods’s beef and chicken chili flavored soup products

WASHINGTON, 2017-Feb-08 — /EPR Retail News/ — Ukrop’s Homestyle Foods, a Richmond, Va. establishment, is recalling approximately 45 pounds of beef and chicken chili flavored soup products due to misbranding and undeclared allergens, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today (Feb. 7, 2017). The product(s) contain milk, wheat and soy, known allergens which are not declared on the product label.

The chili flavored soups with beans and chicken, or beef, were produced on Feb. 2, 2017. The following products are subject to recall: 

  • 6-lbs. of 24 oz. clear plastic containers of “Ukrop’s Chili Flavored Soup with Beans and Chicken” with a sell by date of 02/08/17 on the label.
  • 39-lbs. of 24 oz. clear plastic containers of “Ukrop’s Chili Flavored Soup with Beans and Beef” with a sell by date of 02/08/17 on the label.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 19979” or “P-19979” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in Virginia.

The problem was discovered on Feb. 3, 2017 when a retail store noticed that the product label did not match the actual product.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers and media with questions about the recall can contact Susan Rowe, assistant to the CEO, at (804) 340-3104.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Contact:
Congressional and Public Affairs
Autumn Canaday
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

USDA offers safe food handling tips this Super Bowl

WASHINGTON, 2017-Feb-02 — /EPR Retail News/ — As excitement for this year’s Super Bowl grows, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) encourages consumers to use safe food handling practices at a championship level and avoid becoming one of the estimated 48 million Americans who gets sick from foodborne illnesses each year.

The Super Bowl draws over 100 million television viewers who consume approximately 1.3 billion chicken wings during game day parties. With an average National Football League game taking more than 3 hours to play, Americans will be mixing plenty of football watching with food during Super Bowl parties.

At these parties, it is vital to keep foods out of the “Danger Zone,” which is the temperature range between 40 °F and 140 °F. When foods are left in the “Danger Zone,” bacteria can multiply rapidly, causing a single bacterium to multiply to 17 million in 12 hours. Avoid serving Super Bowl favorites, such as pizza and chicken wings, at room temperature for the entire game.

When serving food or ordering takeout food, use the following game plan:

  • If warm takeout foods are to be served immediately, keep them at 140 °F or above by placing in chafing dishes, preheated warming trays or slow cookers.
  • If take-out foods will not be served immediately, either keep them warm in a preheated oven, or divide the food into smaller portions or pieces, place in shallow containers, and refrigerate. At serving time, reheat to 165 °F.
  • Cold foods that are served should be kept at 40 °F or below, which can be done by nesting serving dishes in bowls of ice. Avoid storing food outside, where the sun can quickly warm foods in plastic storage containers and animals can get into.
  • Start a game day tradition by using a food thermometer to ensure foods being served to guests are not in the “Danger Zone.”

To ensure home prepared chicken wings are safe, follow these tips:

  • Do not wash raw chicken wings. Sixty-seven percent of respondents in a 2016 FDA food safety survey indicated they washed raw chicken parts; however washing will not destroy pathogens and may increase the risk of contaminating other foods and surfaces.
  • Ensure chicken wings are safe to eat by verifying they have reached an internal temperature of 165 °F. Take the temperature of multiple wings in the thickest part of the wing being careful to avoid the bone.

If you need food safety coaching, call your personal coaches at the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline, at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or chat live with a food safety specialist at AskKaren.gov, available from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday, in English or Spanish. Learn more about key food safety practices at foodsafety.gov and on Twitter @USDAFoodSafety

NOTE: Access news releases and other information at FSIS’ website at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Follow FSIS on Twitter at twitter.com/usdafoodsafety or in Spanish at: twitter.com/usdafoodsafe_es

USDA is an equal opportunity lender, provider and employer.

Contact:
Food Safety Education Staff
Press:  (202) 720-9113
Consumer Inquiries:  (888) 674-6854

Source: USDA

USDA issues updated information on food product labeling and new guidance aimed at reducing food waste

Encourages Industry to use “Best if Used By” on Product Labels

WASHINGTON, 2016-Dec-19 — /EPR Retail News/ — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) today ( Dec. 14, 2016) issued updated information on food product labeling, including new guidance aimed at reducing food waste through encouraging food manufacturers and retailers that apply product dating to use a “Best if Used By” date label.

“In an effort to reduce food loss and waste, these changes will give consumers clear and consistent information when it comes to date labeling on the food they buy,” said Al Almanza, USDA Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety. “This new guidance can help consumers save money and curb the amount of wholesome food going in the trash.”

Except for infant formula, product dating is not required by Federal regulations. Food manufacturers frequently use a variety of phrases, such as “Sell-by” and “Use-by” on product labels to describe quality dates on a voluntary basis. The use of different phrases to describe quality dates has caused consumer confusion and has led to the disposal of food that is otherwise wholesome and safe because it is past the date printed on the package.

FSIS is changing its guidance to recommend the use of “Best if Used By” because research shows that this phrase is easily understood by consumers as an indicator of quality, rather than safety.

USDA estimates that 30 percent of food is lost or wasted at the retail and consumer level. This new guidance builds on other recent changes FSIS has made to facilitate food donation and reduce food waste. In January 2016, FSIS issued Directive 7020.1, which made it easier for companies to donate products that have minor labeling errors, such as an incorrect net weight. FSIS has also begun recognizing food banks as “retail-type” establishments, which allows food banks (under certain circumstances) to break down bulk shipments of federally-inspected meat or poultry products, wrap or rewrap those products, and label the products for distribution to consumers. In 2016, FSIS enabled 2.6 million pounds of manufacturer donations.

Comments on this revised guidance may be submitted through the Federal eRulemaking Portal at www.regulations.gov or by mail to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, FSIS, Docket Clerk, Patriots Plaza III, 355 E St. S.W., 8-163A, Mailstop 3782, Washington, DC 20250-3700. All comments submitted must include docket number FSIS-2016-0044. FSIS will accept comments for 60 days.

Reducing food loss and waste is core to USDA’s mission. Since 2009, USDA has launched new and ongoing initiatives to reduce food waste. In 2013, USDA the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the U.S. Food Waste Challenge, creating a platform for leaders and organizations across the food chain to share best practices on ways to reduce, recover, and recycle food loss and waste. In 2015, USDA and EPA set the first-ever national food waste reduction goal of 50 percent by 2030 to reduce the amount of wasted food in landfills.

Source: USDA

MIH Marketing and Sales recalls various meat and poultry products that were stored under insanitary conditions

WASHINGTON, 2016-Sep-12 — /EPR Retail News/ — MIH Marketing and Sales, a Beebe, AR. establishment, is recalling approximately 662,049 pounds of various meat and poultry products that were stored under insanitary conditions, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today (Sept. 10, 2016).

The raw chicken breast fillet, chicken thigh, chicken drum, chicken wing, and chicken tender items were produced by various federal establishments and sold at 17 retail stores located in Arkansas between April 10, 2016 and September 10, 2016. These products were in clear packages weighting approximately 5 pounds each.

Products were sold at the following locations:

  • Edwards Food Giant #19 Forrest City, AR;
  • Edwards Cash Saver #3473 Little Rock, AR;
  • Edwards Food Giant #37 Marianna, AR;
  • Edwards Good Giant #3474 Little Rock, AR;
  • Edwards Food Giant #1710 Harrisburg, AR;
  • Edwards Food Giant #3475 Little Rock, AR;
  • Edwards Food Giant #3444 Bryant, AR;
  • Edwards Cash Saver #3476; Edwards Cash Saver #3442 and Edwards Food Giant #3477;
  • Knight’s Super Foods, Beebe AR;
  • Knight’s Super Foods, Babot, AR.

In addition, various retail meat and poultry products sold at Chicken City Retail stores are being recalled.  These products are in clear retail bags with a sales sticker that include the Sell-By Date between October 30, 2016 and March 19, 2017. The Chicken City Retail Stores that are recalling all meat and poultry products are located in Whitehall, AR; Jonesboro, AR; Conway, AR; Searcy, AR Marion, AR; North Little Rock, AR and Brinkley, AR.

The problem was discovered while the FSIS Office of Investigation, Enforcement and Audits (OIEA) was conducting routine food defense surveillance activities. The FSIS OIEA investigator discovered that the product was being stored under insanitary conditions, including rodent activity, in the storage areas of the property. FSIS and the establishment detained the remaining product. The items subsequently tested positive for alkaline phosphatase, demonstrating evidence of possible fecal matter.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. FSIS has received no additional reports of injury or illness from consumption of these products.  Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers and media with questions about the recall can contact John Hilger, Owner of MIH Marketing and Sales, at (501) -278-7041.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Contact:
Congressional and Public Affairs
Nina Anand
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

Atherstone Foods recalls chicken wrap products due to misbranding and undeclared allergens

WASHINGTON, 2016-Sep-05 — /EPR Retail News/ — Atherstone Foods, a Richmond, Calif. establishment, is recalling approximately 422 pounds of chicken wrap products due to misbranding and undeclared allergens, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today (Sept. 1, 2016). The product contains soy, a known allergen, which is not declared on the product label.

The southwestern style white chicken wrap items were produced on August 29, 2016. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels(PDF only)]

  • 31.2 oz. packages containing 3 packages of 10.4 oz. “Greens & Grains Southwestern Style White Chicken Wrap with chimichurri sauce” with “Use By” date of 090616.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-34221” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in California.

The problem was discovered by the firm during routine label verification.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumers and media with questions about the recall can contact Tom Atherstone, President/Owner, at (510) 236-3500.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Contact:
Congressional and Public Affairs
Allie Ryan
Press@fsis.usda.gov
(202) 720-9113

Source: USDA

USDA’s FSIS: WFSP Foods LLC of Decatur, Ala recalls 18,672 pounds of pork and chicken sausage product

WASHINGTON, 2016-Aug-28 — /EPR Retail News/ — WFSP Foods LLC, a Decatur, Ala. establishment, is recalling approximately 18,672 pounds of pork and chicken sausage products due to misbranding and undeclared allergens, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today (Aug 26, 2016). The products contain milk, a known allergen which is not declared on the product label.

The ready-to-eat sausage items were produced on June 7, 2016. The following product is subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF Only)]

  • 13.5-oz. packages containing “Land O’ Frost Simply Savory Bacon & Cheddar Smoked Sausage” with a “BEST BY: DEC. 04 2016” and packaging date of 06/07/16.

The product subject to recall bears establishment number “EST. 45411” printed on the packaging. This item was shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered in a retail store by a company representative and immediately reported to FSIS. The product has the correct label on the front of the package, which identifies that the product contains cheese. However, the label in the back fails to include cheddar cheese as an ingredient – the source of milk. As a result, milk is not included in the ingredients statement or in the “Contains” allergen declaration.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact the Land O’ Frost Consumer Hotline, at 1(800) 762-9865. Media with questions about the recall can contact Jack Yeo with Fleishman Hillard, at (312) 560-1465.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact the Land O’ Frost Consumer Hotline, at 1(800) 762-9865. Media with questions about the recall can contact Jack Yeo with Fleishman Hillard, at (312) 560-1465.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Contact:
Congressional and Public Affairs
Maria Machuca
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source:USDA

USDA’s FSIS: Sentry Foods of Tucker, Ga recalls 21,570 pounds of frozen chicken

WASHINGTON, 2016-Aug-28 — /EPR Retail News/ — Sentry Foods, a Tucker, Ga. establishment, is recalling approximately 21,570  pounds of frozen chicken entrées  that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically glass or hard plastic, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today (Aug 25, 2016).

The frozen chicken entrée items were produced and packaged on March 17, March 18, April 30, and May 13, 2016. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF Only)]

  • 10-oz. tray pack in box of Saffron Road “LEMONGRASS BASIL CHICKEN WITH BASMATI RICE” with a “Best By” date of “08-19-2017” and lot number 0219-00207-016.
  • 10-oz. tray pack in box of Saffron Road “LEMONGRASS BASIL CHICKEN WITH BASMATI RICE” with a “Best By” date of “10-29-2017” and lot number 0429-00258-016.
  • 10-oz. tray pack in box of Saffron Road “LEMONGRASS BASIL CHICKEN WITH BASMATI RICE” with a “Best By” date of “10-29-2017” and lot number 0429-00207-016.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. P-19031” inside the USDA mark of inspection or printed on the side of the container. These items were shipped to retail locations in Indiana, Texas, and Pennsylvania.

The problem was discovered through consumer complaints reported to the company who then contacted FSIS. No injuries were reported with the complaints.

FSIS has received no confirmed reports of injury or illness from consumption of these products.  Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact John William Morris, Assistant Vice President, at (470) 268-8440. Media with questions about the recall can contact John Conard, Director of Quality, at (470) 286-8440.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Contact:

Congressional and Public Affairs
Gabrielle N. Johnston
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

USDA issues food safety tips this back-to-school season

WASHINGTON, 2016-Aug-24 — /EPR Retail News/ — Back to school, back to the books, back in the saddle, or back in the car for those of us shuttling students to and from school. The new school year means its back to packing lunches and after school snacks for students, scouts, athletes, dancers, and all the other children who carry these items to and from home. One ‘back’ you do not want to reacquaint children with, however, is foodborne bacteria.

Bacteria that can cause foodborne illness, commonly known as food poisoning, grow rapidly at temperatures between 40 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit. In just two hours, these microorganisms can multiply to dangerous levels. To make sure lunches and snacks are safe for those you pack for, follow the USDA’s four steps to food safety: Clean – Separate – Cook – and Chill.

Packing Tips

  • If the lunch/snack contains perishable food items like luncheon meats, eggs, cheese, or yogurt, make sure to pack it with at least two cold sources.  Harmful bacteria multiply rapidly so perishable food transported without an ice source won’t stay safe long.
  • Frozen juice boxes or water can also be used as freezer packs. Freeze these items overnight and use with at least one other freezer pack.  By lunchtime, the liquids should be thawed and ready to drink.
  • Pack lunches containing perishable food in an insulated lunchbox or soft-sided lunch bag. Perishable food can be unsafe to eat by lunchtime if packed in a paper bag.
  • If packing a hot lunch, like soup, chili or stew, use an insulated container to keep it hot. Fill the container with boiling water, let stand for a few minutes, empty, and then put in the piping hot food. Tell children to keep the insulated container closed until lunchtime to keep the food hot – 140 °F or above.
  • If packing a child’s lunch the night before, parents should leave it in the refrigerator overnight. The meal will stay cold longer because everything will be refrigerator temperature when it is placed in the lunchbox.
  • If you’re responsible for packing snacks for the team, troop, or group, keep perishable foods in a cooler with ice or cold packs until snack time. Pack snacks in individual bags or containers, rather than having children share food from one serving dish.

Storage Tips

  • If possible, a child’s lunch should be stored in a refrigerator or cooler with ice upon arrival. Leave the lid of the lunchbox or bag open in the fridge so that cold air can better circulate and keep the food cold.

Eating and Disposal Tips

  • Pack disposable wipes for washing hands before and after eating.
  • After lunch, discard all leftover food, used food packaging, and paper bags. Do not reuse packaging because it could contaminate other food and cause foodborne illness.

Consumers can learn more about key food safety practices at Foodsafety.gov, by ‘following’ @USDAFoodSafety on Twitter, and by ‘liking’ Facebook.com/FoodSafety.gov. Consumers with questions about food safety, can call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or chat live with a food safety specialist at AskKaren.gov, available from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, in English or Spanish.

If you have questions about storage times of food or beverages, download USDA’s new FoodKeeper application for Android and iOS devices. By helping users better understand food storage, the FoodKeeper empowers the public to choose storage methods that extend the shelf life of the food and beverages in their home. Better food storage should reduce food waste and reduce the frequency of users preparing and eating products that may be spoiled. The application was recently updated to include food storage information in both Spanish and Portuguese.

USDA has made some of the most significant updates made since the 1950s to the U.S. food safety system during the Obama Administration. New consumer-facing tools, like the FoodKeeper application, allow Americans to further guard themselves and their family against foodborne illnesses. Estimates show that the food safety standards implemented for meat and poultry will reduce illnesses by about 75,000 annually. More information about these efforts can be found on USDA’s Medium page at http://bit.ly/results-ch7.

Contact:

Food Safety Education Staff
Press Inquiries: (202) 720-9113
Consumer Inquiries: (888) 674-6854

Source: USDA

USDA updates its FoodKeeper App to include food storage information in Spanish and Portuguese

WASHINGTON, 2016-Jul-07 — /EPR Retail News/ — The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced that its popular FoodKeeper application has been updated to include food storage information in both Spanish and Portuguese. Now Spanish and Portuguese speakers can use the app to better understand storage recommendations for 400+ items covered by the tool, including various types of baby food, dairy products and eggs, meat, poultry, produce, seafood, and more.

In the update posted to the Google Play and iTunes stores, users will find a new setting menu offering language options and the ability to display temperatures, weights and measures in Imperial or Metric units. In addition, improvements were also made to how the app syncs with the calendar of smartphones and tablets to reminder users to use food before it may spoil.

“The FoodKeeper app is a very handy and easy tool to use and it reflects USDA’s commitment to provide consumers with information and knowledge so they can make informed decisions,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “This app empowers people to help meet our nation’s food waste reduction goals, and it also links to our virtual food safety resources that answer common questions about how to safely handle, prepare and store foods.”

By helping users better understand food storage, the application empowers the public to choose storage methods that extend the shelf life of the food and beverages in their home. Better food storage should reduce food waste and reduce the frequency of users preparing and eating products that may be spoiled.

The FoodKeeper app was developed by USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service in partnership with Cornell University and the Food Marketing Institute. Since it was launched in April 2015, it has been downloaded more than 100,000 times. Additional updates are planned for September, which will include information on product recalls and educational videos.

“These updates to the FoodKeeper are just one more example of FSIS’ commitment to serving diverse communities,” said Deputy Under Secretary of Food Safety Al Almanza. “We want to make sure the valuable information the application offers is available to as many Americans as possible, which is why we are now offering it in additional languages.”

With the FoodKeeper application, each user can:

  • Find specific storage timelines for the refrigerator, freezer, and pantry, depending on the nature of the product;
  • Get cooking tips for cooking methods of meat, poultry and seafood products;
  • Note in their device’s calendar when products were purchased and receive notifications when they are nearing the end of their recommended storage date;
  • Submit a question to USDA using the ‘Ask Karen’ feature of the application. ‘Ask Karen’ is USDA’s 24/7 virtual representative. The system provides information about preventing foodborne illness, safe food handling and storage, and safe preparation of meat, poultry, and egg products; and
  • Submit items not included in the database for consideration in future updates.

For those that do not have access to a smartphone, the FoodKeeper can also be access at FoodSafety.gov/FoodKeeper.

Throughout the month of July, at the height of summer grilling season, USDA is recognizing improvements made to the U.S. food safety system during the Obama Administration, which are some of the most significant updates made since the 1950s. USDA estimates new food safety standards implemented for meat and poultry will reduce illnesses by about 75,000 annually. USDA has tightened standards for the companies who process and prepare thousands of food products, upgraded technology and internal systems to track and report safety issues to regulators and the public in real time, and knitted together the federal agencies overseeing America’s food safety system to ensure standards are tough on behalf of the consumer, vigilant against emerging risks, consistent and coordinated. New consumer-facing tools, like the FoodKeeper app, allow Americans to further guard themselves and their family against foodborne illnesses. More information about these efforts can be found on USDA’s Medium page at  http://bit.ly/results-ch7.

Contact:

Food Safety Education Staff
Kristina Beaugh (202) 260-8572
Consumer Inquiries (888) 674-6854

Source: USDA

USDA’s FSIS: all makers of raw ground beef products required to keep adequate records of the source material

WASHINGTON, 2015-12-16 — /EPR Retail News/ — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) today announced a new measure that will improve the agency’s ability to determine the source of foodborne illnesses linked to ground beef, stopping foodborne illness outbreaks sooner when they occur.  Based on lessons learned from previous outbreak investigations, FSIS is requiring that all makers of raw ground beef products keep adequate records of the source material, so that the agency can quickly work with the suppliers to recall contaminated product.

Outbreak investigations can be hindered when retail stores produce ground beef by mixing product from various sources but fail to keep clear records that would allow investigators to determine which supplier produced the unsafe product. This new requirement complements expedited traceback and traceforward procedures announced in August 2014 that enhance the agency’s ability to quickly and broadly investigate food safety breakdowns in the event of an outbreak connected to ground beef.

“This is a common-sense step that can prevent foodborne illness and increase consumer confidence when they purchase ground beef,” said Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety Al Almanza. “In the event that unsafe product does make it into commerce, these new procedures will give us the information we need to act much more effectively to keep families across the country safe.”

Under the new final rule, FSIS is amending its recordkeeping regulations to require that all official establishments and retail stores that grind raw beef products maintain the following records: the establishment numbers of establishments supplying material used to prepare each lot of raw ground beef product; all supplier lot numbers and production dates; the names of the supplied materials, including beef components and any materials carried over from one production lot to the next; the date and time each lot of raw ground beef product is produced; and the date and time when grinding equipment and other related food-contact surfaces are cleaned and sanitized. These requirements also apply to raw beef products that are ground at an individual customer’s request when new source materials are used.

“The traceback mechanism provided for in this final rule will facilitate recall efforts that could stop outbreaks and prevent additional foodborne illnesses,” said Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety Brian Ronholm. “USDA is committed to providing resources and assistance to makers of ground beef to ensure they can be a part of this important and essential new public health measure.”

Retail stores regularly produce raw ground beef for consumer sales by mixing cuts of beef from various sources. A 2011Salmonella outbreak in Maine and parts of the northeastern region of the United States resulted in illnesses that could have been prevented if establishments had kept records of suppliers on file. As a result of this outbreak, on July 22, 2014, FSIS published a proposed rule (79 FR 42464) to require official establishments and retail stores to maintain records of their suppliers and source materials received. After receiving and considering comments, FSIS is announcing this final recordkeeping rule that ensures that public health officials have the ability to quickly search records to identify the exact source of the raw beef products during outbreak investigations.

The final rule can be viewed at: www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/regulations/federal-register/interim-and-final-rules.

Over the past six years, USDA has collaborated extensively with other federal partners to safeguard America’s food supply, prevent foodborne illnesses and improve consumers’ knowledge about the food they eat. USDA’s FSIS is working to strengthen federal food safety efforts and develop strategies that emphasize a three-dimensional approach to prevent foodborne illness: prioritizing prevention; strengthening surveillance and enforcement; and improving response and recovery. Other steps taken to improve the safety of ground beef specifically include adopting a zero-tolerance policy for raw beef products containing six additional strains of shiga-toxin producing E. coli, expanding testing procedures for additional components of ground beef, and improving employee training to detect and reduce E. coli O157:H7 contamination on beef carcasses.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can also be accessed 24 hours a day at: www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

Congressional and Public Affairs
Josh Stull, (202) 720-9113

USDA: Unsafe handling and undercooking of your turkey can lead to serious foodborne illness

WASHINGTON, 2015-11-21 — /EPR Retail News/ — Thanksgiving is the largest meal many cooks prepare every year. Its centerpiece—the turkey—is the largest dish most cooks ever encounter, and many are not experienced at roasting one. USDA wants consumers to know that a range of resources, from smartphone apps to its 30-year Meat and Poultry Hotline, exist to help consumers through any food preparation conundrums this holiday season, wherever and whenever they may arise.

“Unsafe handling and undercooking of your turkey can lead to serious foodborne illness,” said Al Almanza, USDA Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety. “USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service has a variety of food safety resources to help with any questions related to preparing Thanksgiving dinner, including our Meat and Poultry Hotline that will be staffed will helpful experts on Thanksgiving Day.”

Cooking Turkey like a PRO:

This Thanksgiving more than 46 million turkeys will be eaten. Cooking the Thanksgiving turkey can be tricky, and trying to figure out when the turkey is done is often the hardest task. But, it doesn’t have to be! Impress your family by using a food thermometer to cook like a PRO: Place the thermometer, Read the temperature, Out of the oven.

  • Place the thermometer in the innermost part of the thigh, the innermost part of the wing, and the thickest part of the breast.
  • Read the temperature to make sure that the bird has reached a minimum internal temperature of 165 °F.
  • Take the turkey Out of the oven, and serve it to your family without worry!

Planning Ahead:

For big Thanksgiving dinners, planning ahead is very important. You can assess your pantry, refrigerator, and freezer to plan out your meals and your shopping list. When you are trying to figure out if you can use something you already have at home, keep the FoodKeeper application handy.

The FoodKeeper is a mobile application created by FSIS in partnership with The Food Marketing Institute and Cornell University. The FoodKeeper offers storage advice on more than 400 different food and beverage items and can help you decide what you can keep and what you should throw out. It also offers handy guidance on leftovers, which you’ll probably have a lot of after the big meal. Download the FoodKeeper today on your Android or iOS device.

There Are Also Real People to Talk to:

If you have questions about your Thanksgiving dinner, you can call the USDA Meat & Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) to talk to a food safety expert. The Hotline has been around for 30 years. Last November they received more than 3000 calls mostly about Thanksgiving dinner. You can also chat live with a food safety expert at AskKaren.gov, available from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday, in English and Spanish.

If you need help on Thanksgiving Day, the Meat & Poultry Hotline phone line is available from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET.

Consumers with more food safety questions can visit FoodSafety.gov to learn more about how to safely select, thaw, and prepare a turkey. FSIS will provide Thanksgiving food safety information during November on Twitter, @USDAFoodSafety, and on Facebook, at Facebook.com/FoodSafety.gov.

SOURCE: USDA FSIS

USDA FSIS: Nation Pizza recalls 59,028 pounds of frozen Mama Cozzi’s Pizza Kitchen products due to misbranding

WASHINGTON, 2015-11-21 — /EPR Retail News/ — Nation Pizza, a Schaumburg, Ill. establishment, is recalling approximately 59,028 pounds of frozen Mama Cozzi’s Pizza Kitchen products due to misbranding and undeclared allergens, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The products contain soy, a known allergen which is not declared on the product label.

The Mama Cozzi’s Pizza Kitchen Rising Crust Pepperoni Pizzas were produced between Aug. 25, 2015, and Nov. 9, 2015. The following products are subject to recall: [Labels (PDF Only)]

  • 27.5 ounce carton containing one “MAMA COZZI’S RISING CRUST PEPPERONI PIZZA.”

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 1682A” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped exclusively to ALDI grocery stores in Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee.

The problem was discovered during in-plant review activities.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Teresa Martinez, Vice President of Quality Assurance, Research & Development, at (847) 348-5433. Media with questions about the recall can contact Richard Auskalnis, President, at (847) 348-5454.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Congressional and Public Affairs
Julie Schwartz
(202) 720-9113

SOURCE: USDA FSIS

USDA: Good Food Concepts recalls 12,566 pounds of beef, pork, and poultry products

WASHINGTON, 2015-10-19 — /EPR Retail News/ — Good Food Concepts, a Colorado Springs, Colo. establishment, is recalling approximately 12,566 pounds of beef, pork, and poultry products that were produced without a fully implemented Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) plan. These products are also misbranded and contain sodium nitrite, which is not declared on the product label, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The beef, pork, and poultry items were produced on various dates between October 16, 2014 and October 16, 2015. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF Only)]

  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT SMOKED BACON.”
  • 1-lb. packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT BACON ENDS.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT SMOKED PIT HAM.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT PORK SMOKE HAM BUTT PORTION BI.”
  • 1-lb. packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT PORK HAM BUTT PORTION BI.”
  • Various sized containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT PORK SMOKED HAM SHANK PORTION BI.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT PORK HAM STEAK.”
  • Various sized packages containing “PORK PEEPA’S HAM BNLS.”
  • 1-lb. packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT PORK SMOKE HAM DICED.”
  • 1-lb. packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT PORK SMOKE HAM GROUND 1#.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT PORK SMOKED HAM SHANKS SLICED.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT PEPPERONI SLICE.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT GENOA CLASSIC.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT BEEF PASTRAMI.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT BOLOGNA SLICE.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT PEPPERONI.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT HAM STEAK COUNTRY STYLE.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT HAM DELI SLICED.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT CANADIAN BACON.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT BOLOGNA 1#.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT PORK LIVERWURST WESTPHALIAN.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOOD DIRECT PORK LIVERWURST PISTACHIO DELI STYLE.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT TURKEY BREAST NATURAL SMOKED, SLICED.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT ROASTED DELI TURKEY.”
  • 1-lb. packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT BRISTOL BEER BRATWURST.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT POLISH SAUSAGE PORK.”
  • 1-lb. packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT SAUSAGE PORK BANGERS.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT ANDOUILLE.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT LINGUISA.”
  • 1-lb. packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT PORK SMOKED GERMAN BRATWURST.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT GERMAN BRATWURST.”
  • Various sized packages “RANCH FOODS DIRECT KOLBASA RING.”
  • 1-lb. packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT 8/1 HOT DOGS.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT SAUSAGE BEEF HOT DOG FOOT LONG 5/1.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT VEAL BRATS.”
  • Various sized packages containing “RANCH FOODS DIRECT CORNED BEEF BRISKET.”

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 27316” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in Colorado and New Mexico.

The problem was discovered by FSIS during a food safety assessment at the establishment.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Nikowa Neill, Administrative Support, at (719) 377-7514. Media with questions about the recall can contact Eryn Taylor, Marketing, at (720) 259-2488.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Congressional and Public Affairs
Katherine Scheidt
(202) 720-9113

SOURCE: FSIS

USDA: 48 million Americans get sick from foodborne illness each year; series of PSAs launched to address food safety

WASHINGTON, 2015-10-17 — /EPR Retail News/ — In an effort to educate children and their families about the importance of food safety, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Ad Council are joining 20th Century FOX to launch a series of public service advertisements (PSAs) featuring Alvin and the Chipmunks. The PSAs use footage from the upcoming film Alvin & the Chipmunks: The Road Chip to introduce viewers to four steps to food safety: clean, separate, cook and chill.

An estimated 1 in 6 (48 million) Americans get sick from foodborne illness each year, resulting in roughly 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Children are among the most vulnerable to food poisoning because their immune systems are still developing, so caregivers need to take extra precautions when preparing food for children under five.

The partnership includes TV, radio, out-of-home and web advertising. Parents and children can also find kid-friendly activities that further reinforce the food safety steps by visiting FoodSafety.gov.

“Young children are at a higher risk for foodborne illness, and keeping them safe is a top priority for FSIS,” said Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety Alfred Almanza. “These familiar characters offer USDA a great opportunity to communicate this valuable public health message in a way to get the attention of children and parents.”

The new PSAs are an extension of USDA and Ad Council’s Food Safe Families campaign, which aims to raise awareness about the risk of foodborne illness and encourage families to learn and practice key steps that will help everyone stay safe from foodborne illness through the following safe food handling behaviors:

  • Clean: Wash hands with soap and warm water before and after handling raw food. Clean all surfaces and utensils with soap and hot water. Wash all produce under running water before eating, cutting, or cooking.
  • Separate: Use separate plates and utensils to avoid cross-contamination between raw meat, poultry, seafood and eggs and foods that are ready to eat (like already cooked foods or raw vegetables).
  • Cook: Cook foods to the safe temperature by using a food thermometer.
  • Chill: Chill foods promptly if not consuming immediately after cooking. Don’t leave food at room temperature for longer than two hours, or 1 hour if temperature is above 90°F.

Consumers can see these new PSAs and learn more about key food safety practices at Foodsafety.gov, by ‘following’@USDAFoodSafety on Twitter, and by ‘liking’ Facebook.com/FoodSafety.gov. Consumers with questions about food safety, can call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or chat live with a food safety specialist at AskKaren.gov, available from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, in English or Spanish.

If you have questions about storage times of food or beverages, download USDA’s new FoodKeeper application for Android and iOS devices.

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USDA: Aspen Foods recalls 561,000 pounds of frozen, raw, stuffed and breaded chicken products

Class I Recall
Health Risk: High

EDITOR’S NOTE: This release is being reissued to expand the July 15, 2015 recall to include additional products. After further analysis, Aspen Foods chose to recall products in an effort to prevent additional illness. Details of this release were also updated to reflect a change in poundage and distribution area.

WASHINGTON, 2015-10-5 — /EPR Retail News/ — Aspen Foods, a Chicago, Ill. establishment, is recalling approximately 561,000 pounds of frozen, raw, stuffed and breaded chicken products that appear to be ready-to-eat (RTE)  and may be contaminated withSalmonella Enteritidis, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The frozen, raw, stuffed, and breaded chicken items that appear to be ready-to-eat (RTE) were produced between August 25, 2015 and September 17, 2015 with “best if used by” dates of August 23, 2016 to December 15, 2016. To view a full list of products recalled as part of this expansion that are Not-Ready-To-Eat, please click here. To view a full list of products recalled as part of this expansion that are part of a variety pack, please click here.The brands associated with this recall expansion include: [View Labels]

  • Acclaim
  • Antioch Farms
  • Buckley Farms
  • Centrella Signature
  • Chestnut Farms
  • Family Favorites
  • Home Dining Selections
  • Kirkwood
  • Koch Foods
  • Market Day
  • Oven Cravers
  • Rose
  • Rosebud Farm
  • Roundy’s
  • Safeway Kitchens
  • Schwan’s
  • Shaner’s
  • Spartan
  • Sysco

Following the original recall on July 15, 2015, FSIS conducted intensified sampling at this establishment to ensure that the hazard responsible for the initial contamination had been controlled by Aspen Foods. Results from FSIS sampling revealed positive results that matched the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis to Aspen Foods products. With this and additional information, Aspen Foods chose to recall additional products in an effort to prevent additional illness. The scope of this recall expansion now includes all products associated with contaminated source material.

On July 15, 2015, Aspen Foods recalled approximately 1,978,680 pounds of frozen, raw, stuffed, and breaded chicken items that appear to be ready-to-eat (RTE) were produced between April 15, 2015 and July 10, 2015 with “best if used by” dates between July 14, 2016 and October 10, 2016. To view a full list of recalled products, please click here | Download XLS.  The brands associated with this recall are the same as those listed above.

The product subject to recall bears the establishment number “P-1358” inside the USDA mark of inspection. This product was shipped to retail stores and food service locations nationwide.

FSIS was notified of a cluster of Salmonella Enteritidis illnesses on June 23, 2015. Working in conjunction with Minnesota State Departments of Health and Agriculture, FSIS determined that there is a link between the frozen, raw, stuffed and breaded chicken products that appear to be ready-to-eat (RTE) from Aspen Foods and this illness cluster. Based on epidemiological evidence and traceback investigations, five case-patients have been identified in Minnesota with illness onset dates ranging from May 9, 2015 to July 22, 2015. FSIS continues to work with the Minnesota Departments of Health and Agriculture as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on this investigation.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after exposure to the organism. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase. FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be in consumers’ freezers. Although the product subject to recall may appear to be cooked, this product is in fact uncooked (raw) and should be handled carefully to avoid cross-contamination in the kitchen. Particular attention needs to be paid to safely prepare and cook these raw poultry products to a temperature of 165° F checking at the center, the thickest part and the surface of the product.

This frozen, raw, stuffed and breaded chicken product was labeled with instructions identifying that the product was raw and included cooking instructions for preparation. Some case-patients reported following the cooking instructions on the label and using a food thermometer to confirm that the recommended temperature was achieved. Therefore, FSIS advises all consumers to treat this product like a raw chicken product. Hands and any surfaces, including surfaces that may have breading dislodged from the product, should be cleaned after contact with this raw product. Also, keep raw poultry away from other food that will not be cooked. Use one cutting board for raw poultry and a separate one for fresh produce and cooked foods.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers with questions can contact the company directly at (844) 277-6802. Media with questions can contact Gene Grabowski, Media Representative, at (202) 270-6560.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

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PRODUCT LABELS. Label images are available in PDF. Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4

PRODUCTS

Prod Code # Description
3048 6OZ.PRINCESS CORDON BLEU
3436 4OZ.BRDED.CORDON BLEU    36PK.
4563 6OZ.PRIN.C/B DICD.HM.CKNG.INST
5865 5OZ.PRIN.B/C   2/14PK. DISPLAY
5866 ROUNDY`S BUFFALO  STYLE  5OZ
5867 5OZ.PRIN.KIEV  2/14PK. DISPLAY
5869 5OZ.PRIN.C/B   2/14PK. DISPLAY
5871 5OZ.PRIN PRMSN  2/14PK. DISPLAY
8680 5OZ.PRIN.C/B   2/14PK. DISPLAY
8681 5OZ.PRIN.KIEV   2/14PK. DISPLAY
8682 5OZ.PRIN.B&C  2/14PK. DISPLAY
10436 4OZ.”ACCLAIM” BRDED.KIEV 36PK.
10524 5OZ.”ACCLAIM” BRDED.KIEV 24PK.
10724 7OZ.”ACCLAIM” BRDED.KIEV 24PK.
13436 4OZ.”ACCLAIM” BRDED.C/B  36PK.
13524 5OZ.”ACCLAIM” BRDED.C/B  24PK.
13724 7OZ.”ACCLAIM” BRDED.C/B  24PK.
14000 FAMILY FAVORITES 5 OZ KIEV
14015 FAMILY FAVORITES 5 OZ C/B
17436 4OZ.”ACCLAIM” BRDED.B/C  36PK.
17724 7OZ.”ACCLAIM” BRDED.B/C  24PK.
20026 5OZ.KIRKWOOD CORDON BLEU 24
20096 5OZ.KIRKWOOD BROC&CHEESE 24
21445 5OZ.PRIN.B/C   2/14PK. DISPLAY
21446 5OZ.PRIN.C/B DICED HAM 2/14PK.
21447 5OZ.PRIN.KIEV  2/14PK. DISPLAY
34250 5OZ.PRIN. C/B   2/14PK.
34251 5OZ.PRIN. B&C   2/14PK.
40512 5OZ.KIEV BRDED.OVEN CRAVER
41512 5OZ.C/B BRDED.OVEN CRAVER
41524 5OZ.C/B BRDED.OVEN CRAVERS
45512 5OZ.B/C BRDED.OVEN CRAVER
45524 5OZ.B/C BRDED.OVEN CRAVERS
46624 5OZ. PARMESAN BRDED. OVEN
53120 5OZ.C/B BRD.OVEN CRAVERS
53122 5OZ. BROC/CHS BRD.OVEN
53130 5OZ.C/B BRD.OVEN CRAVERS
53132 5OZ. BROC/CHS BRD.OVEN
53134 5OZ.KIEV BRD.OVEN CRAVERS
53136 5OZ. PARMESAN BRD.OVEN
53138 BREADED OVEN CRAVER KIEV  5OZ
53140 5OZ PARM BREADED OVEN
53152 KOCH BUFFALO STYLE OVEN
56233 5OZ.CORDON BLEU   4PK.12BX.MS.
56234 SCHWAN`S KIEV  5OZ
99082 5OZ.PRINCESS CORDON BLEU 28
99083 5OZ.PRINCESS B&C 28 PK.
101512 5OZ.PRINCESS KIEV      2/14PK.
102510 36/5oz CHICKEN C/B KOCH LABEL
102512 5OZ.PRIN.CORDON BLEU   2/14PK.
103510 36/5OZ CHICKEN WITH BROCCOLI &
103512 5OZ.PRIN.BROC&CHEESE   2/14PK.
104512 CENTRELLA 5OZ CHICKEN PARM
115500 5OZ.PRINCESS CORDON BLEU
115508 5OZ.  PRINCESS CORDON BLEU
115604 6OZ.PRINCESS CORDON BLEU
115619 6OZ.PRINCESS CORDON BLEU
115650 6OZ.PRINCESS CORDON BLEU
115726 7OZ.PRIN.CORDON BLEU
210509 5OZ.PRIN.KIEV  2/14PK. DISPLAY
210701 7OZ.PRINCESS KIEV N.B.   18PK.
215508 5OZ.PRIN.C/B DICED HAM 2/14PK.
215700 7OZ.PRINCESS CORDON BLEU
215702 7OZ.PRIN.CORDON BLEU N.B.18PK.
215715 7OZ.PRINCESS CORDON BLEU
215720 7OZ.PRIN.C/B DICED HAM   24PK.
255509 5OZ.PRIN.B/C   2/14PK. DISPLAY
255700 7OZ.PRIN.BROC&CHEESE
264509 5OZ CHICKEN W/PLANTAIN
451671 6OZ.PRIN.CORDON BLEU   2/12PK.
594658 CHICKEN BRST ALA KIEV, SYSCO
594666 CHICKEN BRST ALA KIEV, SYSCO
594672 CHICKEN BRST ALA KIEV, SYSCO
594680 CHICKEN BRST W/BROC&CHS BRD,
594700 CHICKEN BRST CORDON BLEU
594710 CHICKEN BRST CORDON BLEU,
594724 CHICKEN BRST CORDON BLEU,
607004 6OZ.PRINCESS KIEV        24PK.

 

PREPARING PRODUCT FOR SAFE CONSUMPTION
USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline
1-888-MPHOTLINE or visit
www.fsis.usda.gov

Wash hands with soap water for at least 20 seconds before and after handling raw meat and poultry. Also, wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot, soapy water. Clean spills immediately.

Keep raw meat, fish and poultry away from other food that will not be cooked. Use one cutting board for raw meat, poultry and egg products and a separate one for fresh produce and cooked foods.

Color is NOT a reliable indicator that meat has been cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria.

The only way to be sure the meat or poultry is cooked to a high enough temperature to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer to measure the internal temperature.

  • Beef, Pork, Lamb, &Veal (steaks, roasts, chops): 145°F with a three minute rest time
  • Ground meat: 160°F
  • Whole poultry, poultry breasts, & ground poultry: 165°F
  • Fish: 145°F

Refrigerate raw meat and poultry within two hours after purchase or one hour if temperatures exceed 90º F. Refrigerate cooked meat and poultry within two hours after cooking.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Congressional and Public Affairs
Gabrielle N. Johnston
(202) 720-9113

USDA: Royal Frozen Food recalls frozen beef and pork products not produced under a fully implemented HACCP plan

WASHINGTON, 2015-9-30 — /EPR Retail News/ — Royal Frozen Food, a Los Angeles, Calif. establishment, is recalling approximately 230 pounds of frozen beef and pork products that were not produced under a fully implemented Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) plan. A portion of these products are missing the USDA mark of inspection and may also contain egg, an undeclared allergen, which was not declared on the product label, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The frozen food items were produced between Sept. 1, 2014 and Sept. 29, 2015. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF Only)]

  • 17 oz. plastic tray package bearing code #607238300447 and containing 10 pieces of “PRECOOKED STUFFED GRAPE LEAVES WITH BEEF AND RICE.”
  • 20 oz. plastic tray package bearing code #607238300454 and containing 8 pieces of “PRECOOKED STUFFED CABBAGE LEAVES WITH BEEF AND RICE.”
  • 12 oz. plastic tray package bearing code #607238300553 and containing 10 pieces of “POT STICKERS.”

Some of the products subject to recall bear establishment number “Est. 20585” inside the USDA mark of inspection. One of the products (Pot Stickers) does not contain the USDA mark of inspection.  These items were shipped to retail locations in California.

The problem was discovered by FSIS personnel performing in-plant verification tasks.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers and media with questions about the recall can contact Gloria Cheng, owner, at (626) 552-1882.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

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SOURCE: USDA