Whole Foods Market’s 365 Everyday Value® canned tuna earned green ranking in 2017 Greenpeace Canned Tuna Shopping Guide

Whole Foods Market’s 365 Everyday Value® canned tuna earned green ranking in 2017 Greenpeace Canned Tuna Shopping Guide

Retailer recognized for strict purchasing policies, transparency and commitment to one-by-one catch methods

AUSTIN, Texas, 2017-Apr-21 — /EPR Retail News/ — In the 2017 Greenpeace Canned Tuna Shopping Guide, Whole Foods Market’s 365 Everyday Value® canned tuna earned a green ranking, identified as a best choice for consumers. Whole Foods Market is the only retailer whose private label brand earned a top score, and the company was named as an industry leader for its new storewide canned tuna sourcing policy.

The Greenpeace ranking evaluated the practices of 20 brands, including whether the fishing method used to catch tuna harms other marine life, whether brands avoid shark finning, and whether they can trace their products back to the source. In addition, Greenpeace examined the equitability and social responsibility of tuna brands.

Greenpeace recognized Whole Foods Market as the first and only retailer to require all canned tuna sold in stores to be caught using pole-and-line, troll, or handline catch methods, which catch fish one at a time, limiting catches, preventing bycatch and supporting livelihoods in coastal communities.

“We have created our own standards for canned tuna at Whole Foods Market to address overfishing and bycatch issues that are common in conventional tuna fisheries,” said Carrie Brownstein, Whole Foods Market’s global seafood quality standards coordinator. “Shifting purchases to sustainable options and having strong traceability to verify our sourcing will have a positive impact on our oceans and the fishing communities who depend on these tuna fisheries to support their livelihoods. Earning another top ranking from Greenpeace is an honor and we hope it inspires others in the industry to take further steps towards greater sustainability.”

In addition to the one-by-one catch methods, Whole Foods Market’s new canned tuna sourcing policy ensures fisheries are certified sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council or rated green or yellow by the Monterey Bay Aquarium and The Safina Center. Every supplier must also use Trace Register, traceability software that tracks each lot of tuna at every point from vessel to can. The traceability data are continuously crosschecked to help verify sourcing and prevent illegally-caught or unauthorized fish from entering the supply chain.

“This commitment from Whole Foods Market sets the bar for other retailers to follow,” said David Pinsky, author of Greenpeace’s canned Tuna Shopping Guide. “Whole Foods Market requires catch methods that benefit small-scale fisheries and significantly reduce the likelihood of human rights violations. It’s great to see this policy extend to the prepared foods department, as well as all the brands on store shelves, driving additional change beyond the company’s private label canned tuna.”

Ranked third overall, 365 Everyday Value® joins the two brands tied for the top ranking – American Tuna and Wild Planet – on Whole Foods Market shelves, contributing to the retailer’s largest selection of sustainable, responsibly-sourced canned tuna. In the 2016 report, Greenpeace identified Whole Foods Market’s selection of canned tuna as the best of any major U.S. retailer.

These continual advancements in policies and sourcing are part of Whole Foods Market’s mission to create a model that moves the seafood industry toward greater sustainability.

SOURCE: Whole Foods Market

PRESS CONTACT:
SOmedia@wholefoods.com

Whole Foods Market commits to rigorous sustainability and traceability requirements for all canned tuna sold in its grocery aisle

Company is first national retailer to create storewide requirements spanning grocery products and prepared foods items

AUSTIN, Texas, 2017-Mar-17 — /EPR Retail News/ — By January 2018, all canned tuna sold at Whole Foods Market will meet rigorous sustainability and traceability requirements that aim to reduce overfishing and bycatch, and support fishing communities. The new sourcing policy includes canned tuna items sold in the grocery aisle as well as the prepared foods department. Whole Foods Market is the first national retailer to create such stringent standards for canned tuna, which is among the three most consumed seafood items in the United States.

Under the new policy, all canned tuna at Whole Foods Market must come from fisheries using only pole-and-line, troll, or handline catch methods, all of which take fish one by one, preventing bycatch and creating more jobs in coastal communities. These fisheries must either be certified sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council or rated green or yellow by the Monterey Bay Aquarium and The Safina Center.

Every supplier must also use Trace Register, traceability software that tracks each lot of tuna at every point from vessel to can. The traceability data are continuously crosschecked to help verify sourcing and prevent illegally caught or unauthorized fish from entering the supply chain.

“We created this new policy for canned tuna because we want to lead by example in sourcing only the highest quality, sustainably caught tuna,” said Carrie Brownstein, global seafood quality standards coordinator for Whole Foods Market. “Combined with better international fishery management, overfishing and bycatch can be greatly reduced when tuna is caught by these low-impact fishing methods. We are honored to be working with suppliers and partners who are driving positive change.”

Leading brands that already source canned tuna from one-by-one fisheries, including 365 Everyday Value®, American Tuna, Pole and Line, Henry and Lisa’s, and Wild Planet, are updating their operations to meet the policy’s traceability requirements. These measures will also help importers get ahead of the traceability provisions in NOAA’s Seafood Import Monitoring Program, which has a deadline for mandatory compliance by Jan. 1, 2018.

Over the coming months, remaining suppliers will shift their operations and fishing practices to use the approved one-by-one catch methods, which are more environmentally friendly and offer more employment opportunities for fishermen worldwide.

“Since America is the largest canned tuna market in the world, shifts toward greater sustainability in this category can create a meaningful, positive impact on our oceans and our global fishing communities,” said Adam Baske, director of policy and outreach for International Pole and Line Foundation. “In some cases, these one-by-one fisheries are one of very few sources of local employment. The boats also make relatively short trips, enabling crews to return home frequently, compared to large industrial tuna vessels that may spend multiple months or even years at sea.”

Whole Foods Market’s new canned tuna policy expands on the retailer’s existing sustainability standards for fresh and frozen seafood, which also require that all seafood must either be certified sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council or rated green or yellow by the Monterey Bay Aquarium and The Safina Center. Additionally, all of the retailer’s farmed seafood must meet its industry-leading aquaculture standards, which include third-party on-site audits.

In 2016, Whole Foods Market introduced the retailer’s first Fair Trade certified yellowfin tuna, a designation which ensures better wages and working conditions for fishermen, and provides additional funding to their communities for improvement projects and investments. Fair Trade certification also verifies full supply chain traceability.

These continual advancements in policies and sourcing are part of Whole Foods Market’s mission to create a model that moves the seafood industry toward greater sustainability.

Press Contacts:

Darrah Gist
darrah.gist@wholefoods.com
678.638.5888

Lauren Bernath
lauren.bernath@wholefoods.com
678.638.5805

SOURCE: Whole Foods Market

Stella McCartney presented her new Autumn 2016 collection at Amoeba Music in Hollywood

Los Angeles, 2016-Jan-14 — /EPR Retail News/ — Tonight (January 12th 2016), Stella McCartney presented her new Autumn 2016 collection at Amoeba Music in Hollywood and paid homage to the local music culture. Alongside the fashion launch were surprise musical performances by Dhani Harrison, New Orleans’ Dirty Dozen Brass Band, You + Me, a collaboration between P!nk and Dallas Green, Beach Boy, Brian Wilson, and Johnny Depp and Marilyn Manson. This is the first time the designer has shown her collection in Los Angeles and the first fashion event for the iconic and largest independent record store remaining in California.

Guests that joined Stella McCartney to celebrate the evening included: Gwyneth Paltrow, Johnny Depp, Amber Heard, Leonardo DiCaprio, Orlando Bloom, Mary J Blige, Ringo Starr, Katy Perry, Kate Hudson, Melanie Griffith, Anjelica Huston, Chelsea Handler, Quincy Jones, Beck, Maya Rudolph, Sarah Silverman, Fred Armisen, Carrie Brownstein, Dave Grohl, Natasha Lyonne, Sam Taylor-Johnson, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Pamela Anderson, Rashida Jones, Nicole Richie, Selma Blair, Lake Bell, Emilia Clarke, Lily Collins, Elizabeth Olsen, Jemima Kirke, Lola Kirke, Stella Banderas, Riley Keough, Odeya Rush, Kiernan Shipka, Amandla Stenberg, Nana Ghana, Gia Coppola, Kim Gordon, Anthony Kiedis, Dhani Harrison, Jakob Dylan, Soko, Alana Haim, Danielle Haim, Estee Haim, Whitney Cummings, Demi Lovato, Ellen von Unwerth, Petra Cortright, Anthony James, Kate Upton, Amber Valletta, Angela Lindvall, Liberty Ross, Frankie Rayder, Dree Hemingway, and more.

The new collection illustrating an individual attitude in a playful style combination of sophisticated, sporty and romantic was showcased on models in fun animated vignettes within the record store. Models dressed in the Autumn 2016 looks played with vintage pin ball machines, video games, a jukebox and video screens. The designer’s signature take on masculine and feminine dressing was well represented in the collection of bold animal prints, sporty diagonal stripes, graphic shapes, and romantic silhouettes.

Accessories that complement the collection including the Falabella bag, Elyse, Binx and Odette shoes alongside the eco-friendly eyewear fabricated from bio materials were prominently displayed.Staying true the designer’s commitment to sustainability every aspect of the collection has been considered to be made in an environmentally responsible way and is consistent with the vegetarian philosophy, completely cruelty free.

To commemorate the event, a limited edition t-shirt will be available for purchase for $35 exclusively in-store at Amoeba Music. 100% of the sales of the t-shirt will be donated to No-Kill Los Angeles, an initiative of Best Friends Animal Society whose mission is to end killing dogs and cats in LA city shelters.

About Stella McCartney
Stella McCartney is a 50/50 joint venture partnership between Ms. Stella McCartney and Kering established in 2001. A lifelong vegetarian, Stella McCartney does not use any leather or fur in her designs. The brand’s ready-to-wear, accessories, lingerie, fragrance, kids and adidas by Stella McCartney collections are available through 49 other free-standing stores including London, New York, Los Angeles, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Paris and Milan as well around 600 wholesale accounts in key cities worldwide.
For more information about Stella McCartney, please visit www.stellamccartney.com

SOURCE: Stella McCartney Ltd 

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Stella McCartney presented her new Autumn 2016 collection at Amoeba Music in Hollywood

Stella McCartney presented her new Autumn 2016 collection at Amoeba Music in Hollywood

Greenpeace names Whole Foods Market the top retailer for seafood sustainability in the nonprofit’s annual ranking of U.S. supermarkets

America’s Healthiest Grocery Store® earns highest score in report’s history for stringent purchasing policies, transparency and advocating for industry change

AUSTIN, Texas, 2015-7-17 — /EPR Retail News/ — For the third consecutive year, Greenpeace named Whole Foods Market the top retailer for seafood sustainability in the nonprofit’s annual ranking of U.S. supermarkets. The company earned the highest overall score in the report’s nine-year history, as well as the highest individual scores for transparency, purchasing policies and private label canned tuna sourcing. This is the fifth time Whole Foods Market has earned the number one ranking.

Greenpeace’s 2015 Carting Away the Ocean’s (CATO) IX report ranks 25 major retailers in four areas: policy, initiatives, labeling and transparency, and red-list inventory. Whole Foods Market’s strict purchasing policies for wild-caught and farmed fish, public advocacy, traceability requirements, canned tuna sourcing, customer education and fishmonger expertise all contributed to the company’s continued leadership in seafood sustainability.

After earning the CATO report’s top ranking in 2014, Whole Foods Market earned an even higher score in 2015 by enhancing sustainability efforts in several areas. The company launched new farmed mollusk standards, adding to its robust aquaculture standards for finfish and shrimp.

“Whole Foods Market is continuously working with our teams and stakeholders to strengthen our seafood sourcing, with the goal of creating an impact far beyond our own company.  When shoppers select sustainable seafood, they are affecting change with their buying power, supporting the fishermen and fish farmers who are producing seafood responsibly,” said Carrie Brownstein, global seafood quality standards coordinator for Whole Foods Market. “Earning another top ranking from Greenpeace is an honor and we hope it inspires others in the industry to take further steps towards greater sustainability, creating a tremendous, positive change on the oceans.”

Whole Foods Market excelled in the Sustainable Seafood Policy category of the report, earning the highest score of any retailer. The company purchases as much wild-caught seafood as possible from fisheries certified by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC). For fisheries not MSC-certified, Whole Foods Market only sources from fisheries rated either green or yellow by the Monterey Bay Aquarium (MBA) and The Safina Center (TSC) (formerly Blue Ocean Institute). In 2012, Whole Foods Market stopped selling all species rated red by MBA and TSC, becoming the first national grocer to make this commitment.

Greenpeace also identified Whole Foods Market’s selection of canned tuna as the best of any major U.S. retailer, an impactful category since America is the largest canned tuna market in the world. Launched in May 2014, the retailer’s Pole & Line Caught tuna is the most sustainable canned tuna option on the market. The fish in every can is caught one at a time using the pole and line method, which eliminates the bycatch of marine mammals, sharks and turtles that occurs in fisheries that use less selective fishing methods. In 2011, Whole Foods was the first retailer in the U.S. to introduce responsibly caught private label canned tuna.

Whole Foods Market excelled in Greenpeace’s labeling and transparency category for having pioneering case signs with sustainability ratings from MBA and TSC, as well as other point-of-purchase information like posters, pamphlets and knowledgeable fishmongers, along with online resources and transparent Quality Standards. The company also has full traceability from source to store, as well as dedicated port buyers selecting fish directly from the docks, and company-owned processing facilities to create a clear, direct connection to seafood sources.

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Greenpeace names Whole Foods Market the top retailer for seafood sustainability in the nonprofit’s annual ranking of U.S. supermarkets

Whole Foods Market’s Responsibly Farmed seafood

Whole Foods Market launches comprehensive standards for farmed bivalve mollusks

Farmed oysters, mussels, clams and scallops audited by third-parties for pesticide use, water quality, seafloor impacts, protection of coastal environment and more

AUSTIN, Texas, 2015-1-30 — /EPR Retail News/ — Whole Foods Market is launching  comprehensive standards for farmed bivalve mollusks, which include oysters, mussels, clams and scallops, all of which will now be recognized by the retailer’s Responsibly Farmed logo for easy shopping.

The seal signifies that each mollusk farm has been audited by a third party to ensure the industry-leading standards are being met, including prohibiting pesticides, monitoring water quality, protection of the coastal environment, evaluation of sediments on the seafloor and traceability from farm to store.

“As mollusks are becoming more popular and the seafood market more global, it’s increasingly important that our shoppers have responsibly sourced options they can trust,” said Carrie Brownstein, Whole Foods Market’s global quality standards coordinator for seafood, and the creator of these new standards. “With Whole Foods Market’s farmed and wild-caught seafood standards in place, and third-party audits of farms, we’re doing the homework for our customers. They can rest easy knowing that any seafood choice they make in our stores is a conscious one.”

Nationwide, Whole Foods Market has seen more than a 10 percent increase in oyster sales alone over the past two years, and expects Valentine’s Day to be the biggest oyster sales day of the year. As consumer interest continues to grow, the impact of buying responsibly sourced mollusks and other seafood becomes more important.

The new standards were developed following several years of research and collaboration with top scientists and progressive mollusk farmers. Like all of Whole Foods Market’s standards for farmed seafood, this multi-stakeholder approach ensures that the standards address all the important issues in mollusk production, set a high bar for environmentally responsible aquaculture, and are practical to implement on farms.

One of the most unique sections in Whole Foods Market’s mollusk standards is the requirement to evaluate the health of sediments on the seafloor under the farms to help protect bottom-dwelling animals and the ecosystem. If mollusks are grown too densely or in areas without enough water flow, wastes can build up that ultimately create sulfides, which are toxic to animals that live in the sediments.

These new mollusk standards are the latest addition to a huge selection of seafood options that carry the Responsibly Farmed label at Whole Foods Market. The retailer introduced its industry-leading standards for farmed salmon in 2007, and released aquaculture standards for all finfish and shrimp in 2008.

Of key importance to all Responsibly Farmed seafood standards at Whole Foods Market are traceability and third-party audits. With independent aquaculture auditors evaluating the farms and strict traceability requirements at every step in the supply chain, customers can feel confident that standards are being met and that they are purchasing the seafood they intended to purchase.

Experts

Carrie Brownstein

Seafood Quality Standards Coordinator

Carrie Brownstein develops standards to guide seafood purchasing for the Company’s stores throughout the United States, Canada, and the UK.

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Whole Foods Market launches comprehensive standards for farmed bivalve mollusks

Whole Foods Market launches comprehensive standards for farmed bivalve mollusks