Sainsbury’s teams up with one of the biggest names in motor sport Williams Advanced Engineering to give its store fridges a turbo boost

Sainsbury’s has teamed up with one of the biggest names in motor sport to give its store fridges a turbo boost.

LONDON, 2015-4-24 — /EPR Retail News/ — Thanks to the technology of Williams Advanced Engineering, Sainsbury’s fridge systems are being fitted with aerofoils – the same technology that helps to improve the performance of F1 cars on the road. These aerofoils have been designed and manufactured by Aerofoil Energy Ltd, and Williams’ Advanced Engineering has worked closely with them to use F1 aerodynamics technology to refine the design.

Aerofoils streamline the flow of air around an object – and help F1 cars to grip to the road. They’re now being fitted to Sainsbury’s fridges – and are already making radical changes to energy use.

.@williamsadveng partners with @Sainsburys to install F1-inspired aerofoils on fridgesClick to Tweet

How does it work?

  • Cold air streams down from holes in the top of the fridge cabinet to keep products cold.
  • Some of this cold air is blown out of the front of the cabinet, into the store, instead of remaining inside. This wastes energy
  • The new aerofoils direct the cold air back into the fridge so less is wasted
  • Aerofoils similarly divert air over and around F1 cars to give them more downforce and allow them to corner faster
  • At night, additional draw down-blinds are used on the fridges to keep cold air in

Sainsbury’s Head of Refrigeration John Skelton said: “We’re proud to be giving our fridges a turbo boost with this fantastic aerodynamic technology. Aerofoils help the airflow around F1 cars and can improve their performance – and that’s exactly how they help the fridges in our stores, by keeping the cold air in. This F1-inspired innovation has already shown it can cut carbon produced by major refrigerators.”

Craig Wilson, Managing Director of Williams Advanced Engineering, added: “Williams Advanced Engineering’s mantra is to take the best of Formula One technology and knowhow and work with a range of industries to help improve their products and services. Much of our work focuses on improving energy efficiency and the collaboration with Aerofoil Energy is a perfect example of how Formula One innovations can have a tangible benefit to ordinary people and the environment. This technology has global potential and the savings in operational costs and emissions are extremely promising.”

Click on the infographic for a larger version

Sainsbury’s teams up with one of the biggest names in motor sport Williams Advanced Engineering to give its store fridges a turbo boost 2

Sainsbury’s teams up with one of the biggest names in motor sport Williams Advanced Engineering to give its store fridges a turbo boost

Sainsbury’s teams up with one of the biggest names in motor sport Williams Advanced Engineering to give its store fridges a turbo boost

Sainsbury’s pioneered new technology to power its fridges in its Portishead store with a new natural product produced entirely from waste

LONDON, 2015-1-21 — /EPR Retail News/ — Sainsbury’s has pioneered new technology to power its fridges in its Portishead store with a new natural product – that’s produced entirely from waste.

eCO2 is made from waste sugar beet in the UK by the manufacturers that supply Sainsbury’s supermarkets with sugar.

The new CO2 natural refrigerant from A-Gas – eCO2 – is the first high specification Carbon Dioxide refrigerant to be produced sustainably in the UK and is a product that can make a significant difference in cutting a store’s carbon footprint.

Typically, more than 40 per cent of a supermarket’s energy consumption is directly linked to its refrigeration systems. Natural refrigerants, like CO2, are becoming a popular option as stores look to reduce their carbon footprint.

Following successful trials with Sainsbury’s, A-Gas has now extended this service to the rest of the industry. A-Gas provides customers with a suitably-rated cylinder in which they can supply a liquid sample from the refrigeration system. This is returned to A-Gas where it is tested at its state of the art laboratory.

The growth in the popularity of natural refrigerants will be further enhanced by the  uncertainty for future strengthening of the F-Gas legislation in the coming years; which will see the phasing out of HFC refrigerants with a high Global Warming Potential (GWP).

Sainsbury’s is looking to reduce operational Carbon emissions by 30% absolute and 65% relative compared to 2005; and at Portishead the supermarket group believes eCO2 is a refrigerant which can make an important contribution to this.

A-Gas Operations Manager Rob Parker said: “The X Factor for eCO2 is the sustainable way it’s produced.

“Most CO2 refrigerants are recovered from dirty industrial processes which are far from green in their methods. eCO2 is a by-product of bioethanol production from waste sugar beet – using crops not destined for sugar production.

“This is a first for A-Gas and the UK market, as a CO2 refrigerant produced from waste sugar beet has never been on sale before on a commercial basis.”

Sainsbury’s Head of Refrigeration John Skelton said: “We wanted to use eCO2 to reduce our carbon footprint. A supermarket refrigeration system operates 24-hours a day, 365 days a year, so it has to be extremely reliable. Having the right refrigerant plays an important part in this.”

Little Story: Postive Waste
Put all waste to positive use.

###

Sainsbury’s pioneered new technology to power its fridges in its Portishead store with a new natural product produced entirely from waste

Sainsbury’s pioneered new technology to power its fridges in its Portishead store with a new natural product produced entirely from waste