USDA FSIS issues public health alert for Ghiringhelli Specialty Foods’ salads with chicken meat products that may be contaminated with Listeria

WASHINGTON, 2017-Nov-02 — /EPR Retail News/ — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert due to concerns that salads with chicken meat products produced by Ghiringhelli Specialty Foods, a Vallejo, Calif. establishment, may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. A recall was not requested because it is believed that all products are no longer in commerce and are past their “Use by” dates.

The ready-to-eat (RTE) broccoli slaw and kale salads with chicken meat items were produced from Oct. 3, 2017 through Oct. 6, 2017. The following product is subject to the public health alert: 

  • 9.3-oz. plastic container with “TRADER JOE’S Broccoli Slaw & Kale Salad with White Chicken Meat” with use by dates of: 10/10/2017, 10/11/2017, 10/12/2017 and 10/13/2017 and lot codes of: 70327610, 70427710, 70527810 and 70627910, respectively.

The products bear establishment number “EST. P-17156” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in Arizona, California, Nevada and Utah.

The problem was discovered on Oct. 20, 2017 when the firm received notification from their supplier that the broccoli products used in the chicken salads were included in a U.S. Food & Drug Administration recall due to potential contamination with L. monocytogenes. The firm notified FSIS on Oct. 21, 2017. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an illness should contact a health care provider.

Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections can occur in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

Recommendations for people at risk for Listeriosis
Wash hands with warm, soapy water before and after handling raw meat and poultry for at least 20 seconds. Wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot, soapy water. Immediately clean spills.

Keep raw meat, fish and poultry away from other food that will not be cooked. Use separate cutting boards for raw meat, poultry and egg products and cooked foods.

Do not eat hot dogs, luncheon meats, bologna or other deli meats unless reheated until steaming hot.

Do not eat refrigerated pate, meat spreads from a meat counter or smoked seafood found in the refrigerated section of the store. Foods that don’t need refrigeration, like canned tuna and canned salmon, are safe to eat. Refrigerate after opening.

Do not drink raw (unpasteurized) milk and do not eat foods that have unpasteurized milk in them.

Do not eat salads made in the store, such as ham salad, chicken salad, egg salad, tuna salad or seafood salad.

Do not eat soft cheeses such as Feta, queso blanco, queso fresco, Brie, Camembert cheeses, blue-veined cheeses and Panela unless it is labeled as made with pasteurized milk.

Use precooked or ready-to-eat food as soon as you can. Listeria can grow in the refrigerator. The refrigerator should be 40º F or lower and the freezer 0º F or lower. Use an appliance thermometer to check the temperature of your refrigerator.

Contact:
Congressional and Public Affairs
Maria Machuca
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

USDA FSIS Issues Public Health Alert on ready-to-eat fried chicken and pork sausage products produced by Pinnacle Foods, Inc.

WASHINGTON, 2017-May-11 — /EPR Retail News/ — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert due to concerns that frozen ready-to-eat fried chicken and pork sausage products produced by Pinnacle Foods, Inc., a Jackson, Tenn. establishment, may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Pinnacle Foods, Inc. has already recalled these products in its recall of its Food and Drug Administration-regulated products. FSIS is issuing this Public Health Alert out of the utmost of caution to ensure consumers are aware that these products, that bear the FSIS mark of inspection detailed below, are subject to the Pinnacle Foods, Inc. recall.

The frozen ready-to-eat fried chicken and pork sausage items were produced from Feb. 4, 2016 to May 4, 2017. The following products are subject to the public health alert:

  • 5.5-oz. individual frozen microwavable dinners containing French toast and a pork sausage patty with “Aunt Jemima FRENCH TOAST AND SAUSAGE” printed on the label and bearing UPC code 051000063915.
  • 16-oz. individual frozen microwavable dinners containing a waffle and a fried chicken piece with “HUNGRY-MAN Selects BONELESS FRIED CHICKEN & WAFFLES” printed on the label and bearing UPC code 658276202903.

The products bear establishment number “EST. 9132” or “P-138” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered when the company notified FSIS that results from environmental samples received May 1, 2017 were preliminary for the presence of Listeria monocytogenes. There have been no confirmed reports of illnesses due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an illness should contact a health care provider.

Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections can occur in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. FSIS will conduct recall effectiveness checks for these FSIS-regulated products identified in the company’s recall notice posted by FDA.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

Consumers and media with questions about the recall can contact:

Consumer Contact:
Pinnacle Foods Consumer Care
1-888-299-7646
Hours: Daily between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern Time

Media Contact:
Sarah Tremallo
908-249-2327
mediainquiries@pinnaclefoods.com

Source: USDA

USDA FSIS issues public health alert on ready to eat chicken strips produced by House of Raeford that may be contaminated with Listeria

WASHINGTON, 2017-Jan-10 — /EPR Retail News/ — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert due to concerns that ready to eat chicken strips products produced by House of Raeford, a Mocksville, N.C. establishment, may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. A recall was not requested because it is believed that all products have now been consumed.

The ready to eat, fully cooked, chicken breast strips items were produced and packaged on September 29, 2016 and served to consumers in December, 2016.

These items were shipped to a distributor in Cleveland, Ohio and then shipped to various restaurants in the area as part of fajita or gyro dishes.

The problem was discovered during routine testing by the establishment. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an illness should contact a health care provider.

Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections can occur in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

FSIS advises all consumers to reheat ready-to-eat product until steaming hot.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

Contact:

Congressional and Public Affairs
Julie Schwartz
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

USDA FSIS issues public health alert on sliced deli meat products served at Dion’s restaurants that may be contaminated with Listeria

WASHINGTON, 2017-Jan-10 — /EPR Retail News/ — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert due to concerns that assorted sliced deli meat products served to customers at Dion’s restaurants may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. The assorted sliced deli meats were produced by Peter DeFries Corporation, an Albuquerque, N.M. establishment.

The sliced roast beef, ham, pastrami, and turkey items were produced between Dec. 14, 2016 and Dec. 29, 2016, however product may have been available in restaurant locations through January 4, 2017.

These items were distributed to Dion’s restaurant locations in Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas. The sliced deli meat products are used on pizzas, salads, and open-faced sandwiches for customers at Dion’s restaurants.

The problem was discovered through routine testing conducted as part of the Peter DeFries Corporation’s Listeria testing program. Anyone concerned about an illness should contact a health care provider.

Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections can occur in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

Consumers who have purchased these products from Dion’s restaurants are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

Contact:

Congressional and Public Affairs
Julie Schwartz
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

USDA FSIS issues public health alert for chicken salad product sold from Costco Store due to possible Salmonella contamination

USDA FSIS issues public health alert for chicken salad product sold from Costco Store due to possible Salmonella contamination
USDA FSIS issues public health alert for chicken salad product sold from Costco Store due to possible Salmonella contamination

 

WASHINGTON, 2016-Oct-12 — /EPR Retail News/ — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert out of an abundance of caution due to concerns about illnesses caused by Salmonella that may be associated with a chicken salad product sold from Costco Store #1190, in Lynwood, Wash.

The chicken salad item for this public health alert was produced Aug. 26 through Sept. 2, 2016. The following product is subject to the public health alert: 

  • Varying weights of “Costco Rotisserie Chicken Salad”.

This product was sold directly to consumers who shopped at Costco Store #1190 in Lynwood, Wash.

On September 26, 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notified FSIS of an investigation of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- illnesses in the state of Washington. Working in conjunction with CDC and the Washington State Department of Health, FSIS determined that there is a possible link between rotisserie chicken salad from Costco’s Alderwood store in Lynwood, Wash. and these illnesses. Based on epidemiological evidence, four Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- case-patients have been identified with illness onset dates ranging from September 2 to September 6, 2016.

Traceback investigation indicated that three of these case-patients consumed rotisserie chicken salad purchased on August 26, August 31 and September 2, 2016 from this Costco location. No product has tested positive for this strain of Salmonella. Clinical isolates associated with this investigation were tested for antibiotic-resistance, and three isolates from Washington State were found resistant only to tetracycline and susceptible to other antibiotics commonly used to treat salmonellosis. FSIS continues to work with Costco and public health partners on this investigation, and will provide more information as it becomes available.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating the contaminated product. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased this product on August 26, August 31 and September 2, 2016 are urged not to consume it. This product should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume rotisserie chicken that has been cooked to a temperature of 165° F. The only way to confirm that rotisserie chicken is cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer that measures internal temperature, http://1.usa.gov/1cDxcDQ.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

Recommendations for Preventing Salmonellosis:

Wash hands with warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds before and after handling raw meat and poultry.  Also wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot soapy water. Clean up spills right away.Keep raw meat, fish and poultry away from other food that will not be cooked. Use separate cutting boards for raw meat, poultry and egg products and cooked foods.Cook raw meat and poultry to safe internal temperatures before eating. The safe internal temperature for meat such as ground beef and pork is 160º F, and 165º F for poultry, as determined with a food thermometer.Refrigerate raw meat and poultry within two hours after purchase (one hour if temperatures exceed 90º F).  Refrigerate cooked meat and poultry within two hours after cooking.

Contact:

Congressional and Public Affairs
Gabrielle N. Johnston
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

###