The Starbucks Reserve Roastery and Tasting Room awarded LEED® Platinum certification

SEATTLE, 2015-11-25 — /EPR Retail News/ — As the first anniversary of the opening of the Starbucks Reserve® Roastery and Tasting Room approaches, the historic building has been awarded a new honor – LEED® Platinum certification. The designation from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is its highest level of certification for environmental design and construction in the areas of energy, water, waste, materials, indoor environmental quality and innovation.

When the Roastery opened its doors for the first time on December 5, 2014, it was heralded as an immersive coffee experience unlike any other. The 15,000 square-foot space featured both coffee roasting facilities and a café, bringing customers on the coffee journey. Just nine blocks from the first Starbucks® store, the opening of the Roastery also brought a historic building back to life and was recognized for its achievement in its restoration.

“The Starbucks Reserve Roastery and Tasting Room is a beautiful marriage of design and efficiency that takes into consideration both a retail and manufacturing environment,” said Liz Muller, vice president of Starbucks Creative & Design, who led the design of the Roastery.

Evolution of Green Building

Restoring a landmark building like the Roastery to such a high environmental standard would have seemed nearly impossible a decade ago, when Starbucks opened its first LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certified store in 2005 in a modest shopping complex in Hillsboro, Oregon. Then, the environmental building movement was still in its infancy with only two percent of non-residential construction projects built to LEED standards.

But Starbucks green building journey actually began years earlier in 2001, when they joined the USGBC and later helped develop the LEED® for Retail program, an effort to adapt the standards to new construction and commercial interior strategies for retail businesses. Starbucks later became one of the first retailers to join USGBC’s LEED volume certification pilot program, providing a practical certification option for retailers of all sizes to implement LEED at scale.

“Starbucks has been one of our very earliest retail partners,” said Scot Horst, Chief Product Officer for the USGBC. “Starbucks really helped form the entire platform for LEED for Retail, and has been important to the evolution of green building around the world.”

Reaching to 1,200 LEED Certified Stores

With a store footprint spanning the globe, Starbucks success also became an opportunity to influence the retail sector.  In 2007, Starbucks committed to designing and building its new company-operated stores to the LEED® standard, integrating green-building into its design process from the very beginning.

Building on early lessons from Hillsboro, Starbucks successfully achieved certification for its headquarters in Seattle and its roasting facilities in Carson Valley, Nevada; Sandy Run, South Carolina; and Augusta, Georgia. In addition to addressing a large portfolio of new stores, the company’s design team also challenged themselves to think differently about green building, with innovative stores made from repurposed shipping containers and indoor-outdoor spaces.

Today, utilizing the talents of 300 LEED-accredited designers in its 18 in-house design studios around the world, Starbucks has more than 700 LEED certified stores in 19 countries. That’s more than any other company in the world and Starbucks has committed to nearly double the number in 2016 with a total of 1,200 LEED certified stores.

“Our job as designers is to create spaces that reflect the communities we serve while anticipating its future needs so that we are designing for the longevity of the neighborhood as well as our business,” said Bill Sleeth, vice president, Store Design. “Our responsibility is to do this in a way that integrates environmental sensitivity and local resources, so that we are also using our scale for good.”

What’s Ahead

Denis Hayes, founder of Earth Day and president of the Bullitt Foundation, underscored the importance of Starbucks green-building efforts.

“The built environment has a profound influence on most of the environmental issues facing the world – climate change, energy waste, water shortages, indoor air pollution, solid waste, ecosystem protection,” said Hayes. “Starbucks is within sight of reaching 1,000 LEED-certified buildings, and that’s 1,000 buildings that are far better than required by law, regulation, or building code. Starbucks has set a high bar that I hope the rest of the commercial sector will follow.”

“Starbucks isn’t done,” added John Kelly, senior vice president of Global Responsibility and Public Policy. “In addition to considering how to better globalize green building standards, the company hopes to influence the green retail sector in a way that takes greater advantage of emerging technologies to move toward a more performance-driven focus.”

Pictured in the photo above from left to right: Jim Hanna, Starbucks director, environmental impact; Dennis McLarren, EPA regional administrator; Arthur Rubinfeld, Starbucks chief creative officer, president, Global Innovation; Scot Horst, Chief Product Officer for the U.S. Green Building Council; Anthony Perez, Starbucks director of concept design.

For more information on this news release, contact Starbucks Newsroom .

SOURCE: Starbucks Corporation

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The Starbucks Reserve Roastery and Tasting Room awarded LEED® Platinum certification

The Starbucks Reserve Roastery and Tasting Room awarded LEED® Platinum certification

Pantheon™ Blend No. 1 is available exclusively at the Starbucks Reserve® Roastery and Tasting Room in Seattle for a limited time

SEATTLE, 2015-1-27 — /EPR Retail News/ — In May 2014 Howard Schultz, Starbucks chairman, president and ceo, came to the Starbucks coffee team with a special request.

He had an idea to celebrate the first Starbucks Reserve® Roastery and Tasting Room, a one-of-a-kind, immersive experience where customers could see the rare small-batch  line of Starbucks Reserve® coffees being roasted. The freshly roasted beans would be delivered to a bar where baristas would create handcrafted beverages using one of six different brewing methods.

“Howard was looking for a special coffee for our Roastery customers, just as a winemaker may have a unique blend that’s available only at the winery,” said Leslie Wolford, senior coffee specialist at Starbucks. “Up to this point, our Starbucks Reserve program featured single-origin coffees – all from one country or growing region, or sometimes even a single farm. He wanted us to break the mold and create our first-ever blend of Starbucks Reserve coffees for our Roastery customers.”

The Creation of Pantheon Blend
Wolford and a team of roasters and coffee experts went to work.

They looked at all the coffees in the Starbucks Reserve® portfolio and started with nine single-origin coffees. Next they roasted and brewed each of them and lined them up on the long tasting room table at Starbucks headquarters in Seattle. From there, the team did a wet blending exercise, spooning different combinations of the coffees – drawing out different flavor notes in each cup.

Each person on the five-member team created two coffees, writing down the recipe on a card that was placed down in front of each cup. The team collectively tasted each of the ten coffees and whittled them down to the top three blends, which were turned over to Starbucks roasters.

“Once we got the blends back from the roasters, we tasted three top recipes for five days and had lots of opinions,” Wolford said. “Then we tried each coffee as a pour-over, in a press, as a shot of espresso, and as a latte. One coffee rose to the top. We invited Howard in to sample, and Pantheon Blend was born.”

Ultimately, Pantheon™ Blend No. 1 was a combination of coffees from Guatemala, Colombia, and Java. Coincidentally those are all coffees on Starbucks original menu board at Pike Place Market store in 1971.

“The experience of this coffee comes in waves,” Wolford said. “We started with Guatemala as the anchor – it’s rich and complex. Next comes the Colombia, which has black currant notes with some sweetness that’s not too overpowering. Finally, the semi-washed Java brings in more of the body and savory notes in the coffee.”

This first blend of Starbucks Reserve coffees holds a special significance for Wolford, who has tasted coffees for Starbucks for more than 20 years.

“To me, this coffee speaks to our history and our future,” Wolford said. “Howard chose the name Pantheon, because it reflects its place among an illustrious group of extraordinary coffees. The best of the best.”

Pantheon™ Blend No. 1 is available exclusively at the Starbucks Reserve® Roastery and Tasting Room in Seattle for a limited time.

For more information on this news release, contact the Starbucks Newsroom.

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Pantheon™ Blend No. 1 is available exclusively at the Starbucks Reserve® Roastery and Tasting Room in Seattle for a limited time

Pantheon™ Blend No. 1 is available exclusively at the Starbucks Reserve® Roastery and Tasting Room in Seattle for a limited time

Starbucks design team chose to feature Mandy Shoger’s hand-crafted pottery with the merchandise curated for the Starbucks Reserve® Roastery and Tasting Room

Everything about a Seattle artisan’s work has a hidden meaning.

SEATTLE, 2014-12-23 — /EPR Retail News/ — Mandy Shoger’s company, Foxtail Pottery, takes its name from the Foxtail Pine. The hardy tree only grows a few inches per year above an elevation of 10,000 feet in the rugged Sierra Nevada mountain range above.  The signature design she creates on hand-crafted pottery is the chrysanthemum. That flower is considered a symbol of life and rebirth.

“My art has meaning, but it is even more important to me to bring art into the functional moments of our day,” said Shoger. “I enjoy making beautiful dinnerware that people will touch and use every day. Art doesn’t have to live in a gallery or on a display shelf.”

Shoger’s philosophy is echoed by the Starbucks design team who chose to feature her hand-crafted pottery with the merchandise curated for the Starbucks Reserve® Roastery and Tasting Room.

Foxtail Pottery joins Seattle’s 5 Lines Pottery and Glassybaby as the first local artisans presenting merchandise commissioned by Starbucks for the new 15,000 square foot Roastery at 1124 Pike Street in Seattle.

The “artist series” will be a rotating collection of mugs, and small bowls, plates and glasses highlighting local designers and brands. The Roastery also offers a whimsical collection of linens, custom letterpress cards, and aprons and leather merchandise from Hardmill, a company founded by two brothers in Seattle.

“As we began planning for the space, we knew the merchandise needed to be unique and special, not unlike our Reserve coffees,” said Jennifer Quotson, vice president, Starbucks Global Brand Creative.

Starbucks designers created a colorful collection of a dozen mugs of different shapes, sizes and textures with the Starbucks Reserve logo – a star over a capital letter R. The Roastery also includes a selection of hard-to-find brewing equipment including: Chemex®, pour-over coffee makers, classic stovetop brewers and kettles, presses, espresso machines, scales and grinders.

In addition to creating a retail experience unlike anything customers have seen from Starbucks before, Quotson wanted to support artists in Seattle.

“We thought about the values of the people we wanted to partner with and the quality of their products,” said Quotson. “There is a synergy between our small-batch coffees and their work in limited runs. There’s passion and playfulness there.”

Shoger’s passion for art began when she was a child. One of her earliest memories is of cutting up colorful pieces of paper and reassembling the shapes to make interesting designs. She was an art major in college, specializing in oil painting. A few years ago she took a neighborhood pottery class and “fell in love.”

“It was like meditation for me,” she said. “Although it required a lot of focus and concentration, I like how calm and centered I felt while using a potter’s wheel.”

Making pottery is also a contrast to her primary job at a Seattle hospital where she’s a technologist in the Interventional Radiology department. Shoger assists doctors who are using technology to guide their tools as they place stents, angioplasties and similar procedures.

Ultimately, she would like to be a fulltime artist and is grateful to Starbucks for the additional exposure her pottery will receive through the Starbucks Reserve® Roastery and Tasting Room. At the moment, Shoger is content with the connection she feels with the people who use her mugs and dinnerware.

“Coffee or tea time is such a comforting, nourishing ritual,” she said. “Having a mug made by hand can make that ritual even more special.”

Video by Fran Ramos-Sabugo Rodriguez

For more information on this news release, contact the Starbucks Newsroom.

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Starbucks design team chose to feature Mandy Shoger’s hand-crafted pottery with the merchandise curated for the Starbucks Reserve® Roastery and Tasting Room

Starbucks design team chose to feature Mandy Shoger’s hand-crafted pottery with the merchandise curated for the Starbucks Reserve® Roastery and Tasting Room