USDA’s FSIS: Chicken soup products of Campbell Soup Company recalled due to misbranding

USDA’s FSIS: Chicken soup products of Campbell Soup Company recalled due to misbranding

 

WASHINGTON, 2017-Apr-24 — /EPR Retail News/ — Campbell Soup Company, a Maxton, N.C. establishment, is recalling approximately 4,185 pounds of chicken soup products due to misbranding and undeclared allergens, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today (Apr 22, 2017). The products contain milk, a known allergen, which is not declared on the product label.

The chicken with whole grain pasta soup items were produced on Feb. 13, 2017. The following products are subject to recall: 

  • 18.6-oz. cans of “Campbell’s Homestyle Healthy Request Chicken with Whole Grain Pasta” with Best By date of Feb. 13, 2019 located on the bottom of the cans.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 4R” on the bottom of the cans. These items were shipped to retail locations in Florida.

The problem was discovered on April 20, 2017 when the firm received notification from their corporate office of multiple consumer complaints of the wrong product noticed inside the cans. The products were labeled as “Campbell’s Homestyle Healthy Request Chicken with Whole Grain Pasta” but actually contain “Campbell’s Homestyle Healthy Request Italian-Style Wedding Spinach & Meatballs in Chicken Broth” soup.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Consumer Affairs at (866) 400-0965. Media with questions about the recall can contact Michelle Reardon, Director of Communications – Americas, at (856) 571-9911.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Contact:

Congressional and Public Affairs
Kristen Booze
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

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USDA’s FSIS: Brownie mix dessert included in the breaded chicken nugget meal trays by Conagra Brands may be contaminated

USDA’s FSIS: Brownie mix dessert included in the breaded chicken nugget meal trays by Conagra Brands may be contaminated

WASHINGTON, 2017-Apr-21 — /EPR Retail News/ — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is alerting consumers that the brownie mix dessert included in the breaded chicken nugget meal trays produced by Conagra Brands, Inc., a Marshall, Mo. establishment, may be contaminated with Salmonella. FSIS is issuing this alert, which affects 110,817 pounds of frozen meals, out of an abundance of caution after the company notified FSIS that the source material used in the brownie mix may be contaminated with Salmonella.

This public health alert applies to the following breaded chicken nugget, macaroni and cheese, and chocolate brownie meal tray ­produced on Jan. 26, 2017: [View Labels]

  • 7.4 oz. vacuum-packed trays containing “BANQUET Chicken Nuggets with Mac & Cheese” with Code 3100080921 and a “BEST IF USED BY” date of July 20, 2018.

The products bear FSIS establishment number “P-9” printed on the side of the box. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered when Conagra Brands, Inc. received notification from a supplier that an ingredient used in the brownie mix may be contaminated with Salmonella.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an illness should contact a health care provider.

Consumers with questions about the public health alert can contact Conagra Brands Consumer Affairs at (800) 289-6014. Media with questions about the public health alert can contact Kristine Mulford, ConAgra Communications Manager, at (312) 549-5522.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: https://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

SOURCE: USDA

Congressional and Public Affairs
Julie Schwartz
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

USDA’s FSIS: Michigan Turkey Producers recalls 54,011 pounds of turkey breast products

WASHINGTON, 2016-Oct-18 — /EPR Retail News/ — Michigan Turkey Producers, a Grand Rapids, Mich. establishment, is recalling approximately 54,011 pounds of turkey breast products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically an unidentified black material, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today (Oct. 15, 2016).

The oven roasted turkey breast items (logs and sliced) were produced on August 29, 2016 and September 16, 2016. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 12-lb. packages containing “MESON SANDWICHES, OVEN ROASTED SLICED TURKEY BREAST” with a use or freeze by date of 11/27/16, and a case code of “48598” on the left side of the label
  • 22-lb. logs containing “OVEN ROASTED TURKEY BREAST WITH BROTH,” with a use or freeze by date of 11/27/16, and a case code of “48576” on the left side of the label
  • 22-lb. logs containing “OVEN ROASTED TURKEY BREAST WITH BROTH,” with a use or freeze by date of 12/15/16, and a case code of “48576” on the left side of the label

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-20935A” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to a distribution center in Florida and food services in Florida and Puerto Rico.

The problem was discovered when the establishment received a customer complaint.

FSIS has received no confirmed reports of injury or illness from consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Deborah Hein, director of quality assurance, at (616) 245-2221, ext. 237. Media with questions about the recall can contact Dan Lennon, president, at (616) 475-4183.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Contact:
Congressional and Public Affairs
Autumn Canaday
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

USDA’s FSIS: Tyson Foods recalls approximately 1,148 pounds of frozen popcorn chicken products

USDA's FSIS: Tyson Foods recallс approximately 1,148 pounds of frozen popcorn chicken products
USDA’s FSIS: Tyson Foods recallс approximately 1,148 pounds of frozen popcorn chicken products

 

WASHINGTON, 2016-Oct-18 — /EPR Retail News/ — Tyson Foods, a New Holland, Pa. establishment, is recalling approximately 1,148 pounds of frozen popcorn chicken products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically hard plastic, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today (Oct. 15, 2016).

The frozen, ready-to-eat, whole grain popcorn chicken items were produced on August 10, 2016. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 35 cases of 32.79-lb. “TYSON FULLY COOKED, WHOLE GRAIN GOLDEN CRISPY POPCORN CHICKEN, CHICKEN PATTIE FRITTERS” with a case code of “70368/928” on the upper right hand side of the label.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-1325” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to a wholesale distributor in Illinois and further distributed to schools and food services in Missouri and Illinois.

The problem was discovered when the establishment received a consumer complaint from a school regarding foreign material, specifically hard plastic, found inside a bag of Tyson brand whole grain popcorn chicken product.

There have been no confirmed reports of injury or illness due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Christina Self, food service consumer representative, at (866) 886-8456. Media with questions about the recall can contact Worth Sparkman, manager of public relations, at (479) 290-6358.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Contact:

Congressional and Public Affairs
Autumn Canaday
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

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USDA’s FSIS: National Meat and Provision recalls 2,349 pounds of beef and veal products

WASHINGTON, 2016-Oct-18 — /EPR Retail News/ — National Meat and Provisions, a Reserve, La. establishment, is recalling approximately 2,349 pounds of beef and veal products that may be contaminated with E. coli O26, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today (Oct. 14, 2016).

The raw non-intact beef and veal items were produced and packaged on Sept. 14-15, 2016. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 51.40-lb. of VACUUM-PACKED “BEEF GROUND COMPANY BURGER BLEND,” packed on 9/14/2016 with a lot number of “00028584” and case codes of 53085/CB136 in the upper left-hand corner of the label
  • 50.00-lb. of VACUUM-PACKED “BEEF GROUND COURSE STEAK TRIM,” packed on 9/14/2016 with a lot number of “00028582” and case codes of 53080/02300H in the upper left-hand corner of the label
  • 10.00-lb. of VACUUM-PACKED “BEEF GROUND FRESH,” packed on 9/14/2016 with a lot number of “00028583” and case codes of 53110/02300P in the upper left-hand corner of the label
  • 50.00-lb. VACUUM-PACKED “BEEF GROUND CHIMES FINE,” packed on 9/14/2016 with a lot number of “00028581” and case codes of 56660/02300C in the upper left-hand corner of the label
  • 51.46-lb. VACUUM-PACKED “BEEF GROUND COMPANY BURGER BLEND,” packed on 9/15/2016 with a lot number of “00028597” and case codes of 53085/CB136 in the upper left-hand corner of the label
  • 10.00-lb. VACUUM-PACKED “BEEF FAT OF RIB CAP,” packed on 9/15/2016, with a lot number of “00028595,” and case codes of 50010/1138 in the upper left-hand corner of the label
  • 10.83-lb. VACUUM-PACKED “BEEF GROUND CHUCK DAT DOG,” packed on 9/15/2016, with a lot number of “00028593,” and case codes of 56135/02150 in the upper left-hand corner of the label
  • 10.23-lb. VACUUM-PACKED “BEEF GROUND CHUCK BRISKET BURGER,” packed on 9/15/2016 with a lot number of “00028596,” and case codes of 53060/208116120 in the upper left-hand corner of the label
  • 5.00-lb. VACUUM-PACKED “BEEF STEAK CUBED 5#,” packed on 9/15/2016, with a lot number of “00028594,” and case codes of 50565/04902 in the upper left-hand corner of the label
  • 10.00-lb. VACUUM-PACKED “BEEF GROUND CHUCK 10#,” packed on 9/15/2016, with a lot number of “00028592,” and case codes of 53015/02100 in the upper left-hand corner of the label
  • 10.11-lb. VACUUM-PACKED “BEEF STEAK CUBED,” packed on 9/15/2016, with a lot number of “00028591,” and case codes of 50555/1100GJ in the upper left-hand corner of the label
  • 10.32-lb. VACUUM-PACKED “BEEF GROUND CHUCK BRISKET 8 oz.,” packed on 9/15/2016, with a lot number of “00028585,” and case codes of 53050/05M8 in the upper left-hand corner of the label
  • 9.98-lb. VACUUM-PACKED “VEAL SIRLOIN CUBED POLY BAGED,” packed on 9/15/2016, with a lot number of “00028590,” and case codes of 56070/0776 in the upper left-hand corner of the label

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. M-22022” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to a distributor, as well as hotels, restaurants and institutions in Louisiana.

The problem was discovered when the establishment received a positive STEC sample during their quarterly E. coli testing program on Sept. 29, 2016. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

Many clinical laboratories do not test for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), such as STEC O26 because it is harder to identify than STEC O157. People can become ill from STECs 2–8 days (average of 3–4 days) after consuming the organism. Most people infected with STEC O26 develop diarrhea (often bloody), and vomiting. Some illnesses last longer and can be more severe. Infection is usually diagnosed by testing of a stool sample. Vigorous rehydration and other supportive care is the usual treatment; antibiotic treatment is generally not recommended.

Most people recover within a week, but, rarely, some develop a more severe infection. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is uncommon with STEC O26 infection. HUS can occur in people of any age but is most common in children under 5 years old, older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume beef or veal that has been cooked to a temperature of 145° F with a three minute rest time. The only way to confirm that beef and veal are cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer that measures internal temperature, http://1.usa.gov/1cDxcDQ.

Media and consumers with questions regarding the recall can contact Amy Philpott, spokesperson, at (703) 472-6615.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

PREPARING PRODUCT FOR SAFE CONSUMPTIONUSDA Meat and Poultry Hotline
1-888-MPHOTLINE or visit www.fsis.usda.gov

Wash hands with warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds before and after handling raw meat and poultry. Wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot, soapy water. Immediately clean spills.

Keep raw meat, fish and poultry away from other food that will not be cooked. Use separate cutting boards for raw meat, poultry and egg products and cooked foods.

Color is NOT a reliable indicator that meat has been cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria.

The only way to be sure the meat or poultry is cooked to a high enough temperature to kill harmful bacteria is to use a thermometer to measure the internal temperature.

  • Fish: 145°F
  • Beef, pork, lamb chops/steaks/roasts: 145°F with a three minute rest time
  • Ground meat: 160°F
  • Poultry: 165°F
  • Hot dogs: 160°F or steaming hot

Refrigerate raw meat and poultry within two hours after purchase or one hour if temperatures exceed 90º F. Refrigerate cooked meat and poultry within two hours after cooking.

 

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Contact:
Congressional and Public Affairs
Autumn Canaday
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

USDA’s FSIS: Kapowsin Meats Inc of Graham, Wash. Recalls 11,658 pounds of pork products

WASHINGTON, 2016-Jul-23 — /EPR Retail News/ — Kapowsin Meats Inc., a Graham, Wash. establishment, is recalling approximately 11,658 pounds of pork products that may be contaminated with Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:-, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The whole roaster hogs were produced between June 13, 2016 and July 15, 2016. The following products are subject to recall:

  • Varying weights of boxed/bagged Whole Hogs for Barbeque

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 1628M” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to various individuals, retail locations, institutions, and distributors in Washington.

FSIS was notified of an illness investigation in Washington on July 13, 2016. The Washington State Department of Health updated FSIS on July 19, 2016 of confirmed case-patients involved in an illness outbreak of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:-. Working in conjunction with the Washington State Department of Health, local health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), FSIS determined that there is a highly probable link between whole hogs for barbeque from Kapowsin Meats and this illness cluster. Based on epidemiological investigation, three Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- case-patients have been identified with illness onset dates ranging from July 5, 2016, to July 7, 2016. Traceback investigation indicated that three case-patients consumed whole hog roasters for barbeque from Kapowsin Meats. At this time, it is not known if this outbreak strain has any drug resistance; results are pending.

This investigation is ongoing. FSIS continues to work with public health partners at the Washington State Department of Health, local health and the CDC on this investigation.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after exposure to the organism. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume pork and whole hogs for barbeque that have been cooked to a minimum internal temperature of 145° F with a three minute rest time. The only way to confirm that whole hogs for barbeque are cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer that measures internal temperature, http://1.usa.gov/1cDxcDQ. For whole hogs for barbeque make sure to check the internal temperature with a food thermometer in numerous places, including near the bone. Check the temperature frequently and replenish wood or coals to make sure the fire stays hot. Remove only enough meat from the carcass as you can serve within 1-2 hours.

Media and consumers with questions regarding the recall can contact John Anderson, Owner, at (253) 847-1777.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov.The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

PREPARING PRODUCT FOR SAFE CONSUMPTION
USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHOTLINE or visit www.fsis.usda.govWash hands with warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds before and after handling raw meat and poultry. Wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot, soapy water. Immediately clean spills.Keep raw meat, fish and poultry away from other food that will not be cooked. Use separate cutting boards for raw meat, poultry and egg products and cooked foods.Color is NOT a reliable indicator that meat has been cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria.The only way to be sure the meat or poultry is cooked to a high enough temperature to kill harmful bacteria is to use a thermometer to measure the internal temperature.

  • Fish: 145°F
  • Beef, pork, lamb chops/steaks/ roasts: 145°F with a three minute rest time
  • Ground meat: 160°F
  • Poultry: 165°F
  • Hot dogs: 160°F or steaming hot

Refrigerate raw meat and poultry within two hours after purchase or one hour if temperatures exceed 90º F. Refrigerate cooked meat and poultry within two hours after cooking.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

 

Contact:
Congressional and Public Affairs
Gabrielle N. Johnston
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

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USDA's FSIS: Kapowsin Meats Inc of Graham, Wash. Recalls 11,658 pounds of pork products
USDA’s FSIS: Kapowsin Meats Inc of Graham, Wash. Recalls 11,658 pounds of pork products

 

Source: USDA

USDA’s FSIS: U.S. Cado Holdings, Inc. Recalls 1,650 pounds of imported, frozen Swai fillets products

WASHINGTON, 2016-Jul-16 — /EPR Retail News/ — U.S. Cado Holdings, Inc., a Santa Ana, Calif. establishment, is recalling approximately 1,650 pounds of imported, frozen Swai fillets products that were distributed into U.S. commerce without meeting federal importation requirements, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. [View Labels(PDF Only)]

The Deep Water Sea Food brand Frozen Swai fillets were produced on April 5, 2016. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 15-lb. boxes containing bulk pieces of “Frozen Swai Fillets” with the label DEEP WATER SEA FOOD, “Production Date: 04/05/2016,” and “Best Before Date: 10/05/2017.” The products subject to recall bear the Factory Number UCH001 on the box and bear the lot number 1683475. These items were shipped to institutional locations in Puerto Rico. The boxes are marked as “9/11 oz.”

The problem was discovered when the customer and import establishment notified FSIS personnel of Swai products entering U.S. commerce without meeting FSIS regulatory requirements for imported Siluriformes. The products were imported from Vietnam and failed to comply with FSIS requirements concerning residue sampling and testing prior to entry into United States commerce. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

Details of the first expansion are: June 25, 2016— U.S. Cado Holdings, Inc., a Santa Ana, Calif. establishment recalled approximately 2,235 pounds of imported, frozen Swai fillets produced and packed on March 1, 9, and 16, 2016 in Vietnam by Golden Quality Seafood Corporation. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 15-lb. boxes containing individually wrapped pieces of “Skinless and Boneless Swai Fillets” with the label DELTA’S BEST BASA BRAND and the lot number 023015 and 023021, and best by dates of 03-01-2018, 03-09-2018, and 03-16-2018.

The products subject to recall bear no plant number on the box, but do bear the lot number 023015 and 023021, and best by dates of 03-01-2018, 03-09-2018, and 03-16-2018. These items were shipped to retail locations in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas.

The problem was discovered when the customer and imported establishment notified FSIS personnel of Swai products entering U.S. commerce without meeting FSIS regulatory requirements for imported Siluriformes. The products were imported from Vietnam and failed to comply with FSIS requirements concerning residue sampling and testing prior to entry into United States commerce. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

Details of the first recall are: June 20, 2016– U.S. Cado Holdings, Inc., a Santa Ana, Calif. establishment, recalled approximately 25,760 pounds of imported, frozen Swai fillets products that were distributed into U.S. commerce without meeting federal requirements.

The skinless and boneless Sea Queen brand Swai Fillet items were produced and packed on March 30, 2016, in Vietnam by Golden Quality Seafood Corporation. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 2-lb. (32-oz.) packages containing individually wrapped pieces of “Skinless and Boneless Swai Fillets.”

The products subject to recall bear plant number FN1158, lot number SW1601-02-16090, and have a “best by” date of March 30, 2018. These items were shipped to Aldi distribution centers in Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee.

The problem was discovered when the customer and import establishment notified FSIS personnel of Swai products entering U.S. commerce without meeting FSIS regulatory requirements for imported Siluriformes. The products were imported from Vietnam and failed to comply with FSIS requirements concerning residue sampling and testing prior to entry into United States commerce. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase. Consumers and Media with questions about the recall can contact Paul Nguyen, U.S. Cado Holdings Inc., Manager, at (714) 973-2272.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

 Under the Federal Meat Inspection Act and implementing regulations, the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) ensures that Siluriformes fish and fish products in foreign and domestic commerce are safe, wholesome, and not adulterated or misbranded. FSIS samples imported product for drug, pesticide, and other chemical residues. For more information, please visit: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/inspection/siluriformes/operations-inspection under Hold-and-Test Sampling Protocol for Shipments of Siluriformes Fish/Fish Products from Foreign Establishments that Export Product that Contains a Violative Chemical Residue(s) as Identified by FSIS Border Sampling and Testing.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

EDITORS NOTE:
This release is being reissued as an expansion of the June 20, 2016  and June 25, 2016 recalls to include additional products, production dates, and distribution area. The first recall 052-2016 on June 20, 2016 involved 25,760 pounds of frozen swai fillet products. The recall expansion on June 25, 2016 involved an additional 2,235 pounds of Individually Quick Frozen (IQF) Swai fillet products. The second recall expansion on July 14, 2016  involved an additional 1,650 pounds of frozen Swai Fillets. The combined number of recalled product from June 20, 2016 to July 14, 2016 is 29,645 pounds of frozen Swai imported from Vietnam.

Contact:
Congressional and Public Affairs
Nina A. Anand
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

USDA’s FSIS to begin sharing new levels of food safety data specific to slaughter and processing facilities on Data.gov

WASHINGTON, 2016-Jul-12 — /EPR Retail News/ — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) today announced that it will soon begin sharing new levels of food safety data specific to slaughter and processing facilities in the United States, on Data.gov. The agency has detailed its framework for releasing this data in its Establishment-Specific Data Release Plan, which the agency anticipates will allow consumers to make more informed choices, motivate individual establishments to improve performance, and lead to industry-wide improvements in food safety by providing better insights into strengths and weaknesses of different practices.

“FSIS’ food safety inspectors collect vast amounts of data at food producing facilities every day, which we analyze on an ongoing basis to detect emerging public health risks and create better policies to prevent food borne illness,” said USDA Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety Al Almanza. “Consumers want more information about the foods they are purchasing, and sharing these details can give them better insight into food production and inspection, and help them make informed purchasing decisions.”

FSIS employs roughly 7,500 food safety inspectors who work in more than 6,000 meat, poultry and processed egg facilities across the country and more than 120 ports of entry every day. Over the past seven years, the agency has taken an increasingly data-driven approach to identifying and preventing food safety concerns, and the data these men and women collect in regulated facilities every day have made it possible for FSIS to implement significant food safety changes since 2009. More information about these efforts to modernize food safety inspection can be found at www.Medium.com/USDA-Results. Between 2009 and 2015, this work led to a 12 percent drop in foodborne illness associated with FSIS-regulated products.

The new data sets will begin to publish on Data.gov on a quarterly basis starting 90 days after publication in the Federal Register. Initially, FSIS will share information on the processes used at each facility, giving more detail than is currently listed in the searchable establishment directory, as well as a code for each facility that will make it easier to sort and combine future data sets by facility. Additionally, FSIS will release results for Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) and Salmonella in ready-to-eat (RTE) products and processed egg products.

On a quarterly basis, FSIS will then begin to share other datasets, including results for Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli(STEC) and Salmonella in raw, non-intact beef products; results for Salmonella and Campylobacter in young chickens and young turkeys, comminuted poultry, and chicken parts; routine chemical residue testing data in meat and poultry products; and advanced meat recovery testing data.

Criteria such as data availability and possible impact on public health will be considered by FSIS to determine which data sets are best suited for future public release. User guides that provide context to the data will be included with each data set.

“This plan is another step toward better engagement with our stakeholders and they will now have quality information on an ongoing basis,” stated USDA Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety Al Almanza.

The Establishment-Specific Data Release Plan was developed in response to the President Obama’s call for increased data sharing and greater transparency under the Open Government Plan by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Beginning in 2010, FSIS consulted with various stakeholder groups, including the National Advisory Committee on Meat and Poultry Inspection Subcommittee on Data Collection, Analysis, and Transparency and the National Research Council on this issue. With the expertise of these organizations, FSIS developed its plan that will not only provide consumers with the opportunity to make more informed choices, but make data publicly available that could yield valuable insights that go beyond the regulatory uses for which the data were collected.

Contact:
Congressional and Public Affairs
Gabrielle N. Johnston
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

Source: USDA

Ghiringhelli Specialty Foods recalls 2,444 pounds of poultry products due to mislabeling and undeclared allergens – USDA’s FSIS

WASHINGTON, 2016-Jun-29 — /EPR Retail News/ — Ghiringhelli Specialty Foods, Inc., a Vallejo, Calif., establishment, is recalling approximately 2,444 pounds of poultry products due to mislabeling and undeclared allergens, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The products contain soy, wheat, and fish (anchovies), known allergens which are not declared on the product label. Additionally, the Caesar Salad products usually have the statement “May Contain Traces of Shellfish.” This statement is missing on the recalled products.

The chicken Caesar Salad items were produced on June 22, 2016. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels]

  • 9-OZ. Plastic clamshell with clear lid containers of “TRADER GIOTTO’S CAESAR SALAD WITH CHICKEN BREAST” bearing plant number P-17156 and “USE BY 06/28” on the label.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-17156” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in California, Colorado, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utah and Washington state.

The company notified FSIS of the mislabeling on June 25, 2016, after the company received notice of the issue from a customer. The salads have the correct label on the top of the package, but exhibit an incorrect back label for “Trader Joe’s Chicken & Roast Beet Salad.” [See labels.]

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers and media with questions about the recall can contact Mike Ghiringhelli, Jr., General Manager, at (707) 561-7670 ext. 105.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

Contact:

Congressional and Public Affairs
Benjamin A. Bell
(202) 720-9113

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Ghiringhelli Specialty Foods recalls 2,444 pounds of poultry products due to mislabeling and undeclared allergens - USDA's FSIS

Ghiringhelli Specialty Foods recalls 2,444 pounds of poultry products due to mislabeling and undeclared allergens – USDA’s FSIS

 

Source: USDA

USDA’s FSIS on summer cookouts: Extra care should be taken to make sure perishable food doesn’t spend too long in the Danger Zone

WASHINGTON, 2016-Jun-02 — /EPR Retail News/ — Summer cookouts are right around the corner and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is urging consumers to remember the four simple steps to food safety – Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill – and to steer clear of the ‘Danger Zone’ while cooking outdoors.

“This Memorial Day weekend and all summer long, I encourage families to get outside and enjoy the great outdoors and the variety of food America’s farmers are able to provide,” said Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety Al Almanza. “It’s important to remember that bacteria grow faster in the same warm temperatures, so extra care should be taken to make sure perishable food doesn’t spend too long in the Danger Zone. That is temperatures between 40 and 140 ˚F when perishable food spoils rapidly. Foods that should be served hot or cold should not spend more than one hour in the Danger Zone when temperatures are above 90 ˚F, and two hours when temperatures are below 90 ˚F.”

Planning ahead is a key factor for ensuring food is safely handled and stored, and USDA’s FoodKeeper App can help. Developed by FSIS in partnership with Cornell University and the Food Marketing Institute, this application informs users on how to store food and beverages to maximize their freshness and quality, helping to promote food safety while also reducing food waste. The FoodKeeper application offers users valuable storage advice about more than 400 food and beverage items, including various types of baby food, dairy products and eggs, meat, poultry, produce, seafood, and more. The app also links to FSIS’ other digital resources, such as AskKaren.

What is the Danger Zone?

The Danger Zone is the temperature range in which bacteria can grow faster. Bacteria can actually double in number in as little as 20 minutes when perishable food is kept in the Danger Zone. In order to steer clear of the Danger Zone, you should always:

  • Keep cold food, at or below 40 °F, in the refrigerator, in coolers, or in containers on ice.
  • Limit the time coolers are open. Open and close the lid quickly. Do not leave coolers in direct sunlight.
  • Keep foods served hot at or above 140 °F, in chafing dishes, warming trays, slow cookers or on the grill. You can keep cooked meats hot by setting them to the side of the grill rack, not directly over the coals where they could overcook.
  • Use a food thermometer to check the safe recommended temperatures.
  • Never leave food between 40 and 140 ˚F for more than two hours.  If the temperature is above 90 °F, food should not be left out more than one hour.

As always, we remind consumers to follow the four steps to food safety when preparing dishes for a cookout:

Clean: Make sure to always wash your hands and surfaces with soap and warm water for 20 seconds before cooking and after handling raw meat or poultry during cooking. Wash cutting boards, dishes, utensils, and work spaces with soap and warm water too. If you plan to be away from the kitchen, pack clean cloths and moist towelettes for cleaning surfaces and hands.

Separate:  When taking food off the grill, use a clean platter. Don’t put cooked food on the same platter that held raw meat or poultry. Any harmful bacteria present in the raw meat juices could contaminate safely cooked food.

Cook: Always use a food thermometer to check the internal temperature of burgers, steaks, chicken, and foods containing meat or poultry.

  • Hamburgers, sausages and other ground meats should reach 160 °F.
  • All poultry should reach a minimum temperature of 165 °F.
  • Whole cuts of pork, lamb, veal, and of beef should be cooked to 145 °F as measured by a food thermometer placed in the thickest part of the meat, and allowed to rest for three minutes before eating. A “rest time” is the amount of time the product remains at the final temperature, after it has been removed from a grill, oven, or other heat source. During the three minutes after meat is removed from the heat source, its temperature remains constant or continues to rise, which destroys pathogens.
  • Fish should be cooked to 145 °F.
  • Meat and poultry cooked on a grill often browns very fast on the outside, and by using a food thermometer you can be sure items have reached a safe minimum internal temperature needed to destroy any harmful bacteria that may be present.

Chill: After a cookout, place leftovers in shallow containers and refrigerate or freeze immediately. Discard food left in the Danger Zone too long. Remember, when in doubt, throw it out!

Food Safety Education Staff
Press Inquiries (202) 720-9113
Consumer Inquiries (888) 674-6854

SOURCE: FSIS

USDA’s FSIS: Taylor Farms Florida, Inc. recalls 151 pounds of chicken salad

WASHINGTON, 2016-Jun-02 — /EPR Retail News/ — Taylor Farms Florida, Inc., an Orlando, Fla. establishment, is recalling approximately 151 pounds of a chicken salad product due to misbranding and undeclared allergens, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The product may contain wheat and sesame ingredients, known allergens that are not declared on the mislabeled product label.

The ready-to-eat (RTE) chicken salad item was produced on May 23, 2016. The following product is subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF Only)]

  • 11-oz. (312-g) of individually packaged “Wawa thai style chicken mango salad with thai peanut flavored dressing” with a sell by date of 05/28/2016.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “Est. P-44818” inside the USDA mark of inspection. This item was shipped to Wawa convenience stores in Florida.

The problem was discovered on May 25, 2016, when the establishment notified FSIS personnel of the mislabeling issue affecting the salads. The salads have the correct label on the top of the package, but an incorrect back label saying “Wawa superfood salad.” Taylor Farms Florida, Inc. received notice from their customer. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of this product. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased this product are urged not to consume them. This product should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumers and media with questions about the recall can contact Leonard Batti (407)-235-1800.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Congressional and Public Affairs
Gabrielle N. Johnston
(202) 720-9113

SOURCE: FSIS

USDA’s FSIS: Garland Ventures LTD recalls 114,870 pounds of chicken fried rice products

WASHINGTON, 2016-May-13 — /EPR Retail News/ — Garland Ventures LTD, a Garland, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 114,870 pounds of chicken fried rice  products that may be adulterated with Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The heat-treated, not fully cooked, not shelf stable chicken fried rice products were produced on various dates between Sept. 24, 2015 and Mar. 23, 2016. The following products are subject to recall: [View Label (PDF only)]

  • 20 oz. pail boxes containing AllFresh Foods “ANJOY Chicken Fried Rice.”

Case Codes associated with the “ANJOY Chicken Fried Rice” product are as follows: 092415, 092915, 100215, 101325, 101615, 102015, 102715, 110315, 110615 and 032316.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-31993” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail distributor locations in Colorado, Georgia, Missouri, and Utah.

The problem was discovered when Garland Ventures LTD was notified by their supplier of vegetable fried rice, Ajinomoto Windsor Inc., that frozen foods involved in CRF Frozen Foods’ recall were incorporated in their products. CRF Frozen Foods of Pasco, Washington voluntarily recalled frozen vegetable items due to an illness outbreak of listeriosis.  There have been no confirmed reports of illness or adverse reactions due to consumption of Garland Ventures’ products.

The CRF Frozen Foods’ recall can be found at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm498841.htm.

Consumption of food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

FSIS advises all consumers to reheat ready-to-eat product until steaming hot.

Media and consumers with questions regarding the recall can contact Robert Cocat, Garland Ventures LTD, General Manager, at (972) 485-8878.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

PREPARING PRODUCT FOR SAFE CONSUMPTION
USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline
1-888-MPHOTLINE or visit
www.fsis.usda.gov

  • Wash hands with warm, soapy water before and after handling raw meat and poultry for at least 20 seconds. Wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot, soapy water. Immediately clean spills.
  • Do not eat hot dogs, luncheon meats, bologna or other deli meats unless reheated until steaming hot.
  • Do not eat refrigerated pate, meat spreads from a meat counter or smoked seafood found in the refrigerated section of the store. Foods that do not need refrigeration, like canned tuna and canned salmon, are safe to eat. Refrigerate after opening.
  • Do not drink raw (unpasteurized) milk and do not eat foods that have unpasteurized milk in them.
  • Do not eat salads made in the store, such as ham salad, chicken salad, egg salad, tuna salad or seafood salad.
  • Do not eat soft cheeses, such as Feta, queso blanco, queso fresco, Brie, Camembert cheeses, blue-veined cheeses and Panela, unless it is labeled as made with pasteurized milk.
  • Use precooked or ready-to-eat food as soon as you can. L. monocytogenes can grow in the refrigerator. The refrigerator should be 40º F or cooler and the freezer 0º F or colder Use an appliance thermometer to check the temperature of your refrigerator.

 

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Congressional and Public Affairs
Brittany C. Woodland
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

USDA’S FSIS: Perfect Fit Meals recalls 10,455 pounds of poultry entrees due to misbranding and undeclared allergens

WASHINGTON, 2016-Apr-15 — /EPR Retail News/ — Perfect Fit Meals, LLC, a Houston, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 10,455 pounds of poultry entrees due to misbranding and undeclared allergens, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The products are mislabeled and one of the products, the Turkey Enchilada, may contain milk, a known allergen which is not declared on the mislabeled product label.

The Turkey Enchilada items were produced on March 28, 2016. The Lemon Pepper Chicken items were produced on March 25, 2016. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels(PDF only)]

  • 10.4-oz. sealed tray packages with a label that says “Perfect Fit Meals Texas Chicken Ranch Casserole” with a use-by date of 4/24/2016, but may contain “Perfect Fit Meals Lemon Pepper Chicken.”
  • 11-oz sealed tray packages with a label that says “Perfect Fit Meals Chipotle Chicken Sausage” with a use-by date of 5/2/2016, but may contain “Perfect Fit Meals Turkey Enchilada.”

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-827” inside the USDA mark of inspection on the sealed tray packages. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered after the firm was notified by a retailer that the products were incorrectly labeled.

Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Mona Powell, Quality Assurance, at (281) 953-3200. Media with questions about the recall can contact Brad Wilson, CEO, at (713) 579-5686.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Congressional and Public Affairs
Katherine Scheidt  (202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

USDA’s FSIS: Marin Pasta Works recalls 491 pounds of pork ravioli products

WASHINGTON, 2016-Feb-05 — /EPR Retail News/ — Marin Pasta Works, a San Rafael, Calif. establishment, is recalling approximately 491 pounds of pork ravioli products that were produced without the benefit of federal inspection, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The sausage, parmesan and spinach ravioli items were produced between Jan. 4, 2016 to Feb. 4, 2016. The following products are subject to recall: [View Label]

  • 12-oz.vacuum-packaged packages containing pieces of “Sausage, Parm and Spinach Ravioli” with Best By Dates of Feb. 4 to March 4, 2016.

These items were distributed to retail locations in California.

The problem was discovered during FSIS surveillance activities conducted at a retail store in San Rafael, California.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers and members of the media with questions about the recall can contact John Sarrran, Owner of Marin Pasta Works, at (877) 263-2332 ext 310.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Congressional and Public Affairs
Veronika Medina (202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

 

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USDA's FSIS: Marin Pasta Works recalls 491 pounds of pork ravioli products

USDA’s FSIS: Marin Pasta Works recalls 491 pounds of pork ravioli products

USDA’s FSIS announced new federal standards to reduce Salmonella and Campylobacter in ground chicken and turkey products

New Standards to Help Prevent an Estimated 50,000 Illnesses Annually

WASHINGTON, 2016-Feb-05 — /EPR Retail News/ — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) today announced the finalization of new federal standards to reduce Salmonella and Campylobacter in ground chicken and turkey products, as well as in raw chicken breasts, legs, and wings. Based on scientific risk assessments, FSIS estimates that implementation of these standards will lead to an average of 50,000 prevented illnesses annually.

As part of this move to make chicken and turkey items that Americans frequently purchase safer to eat, FSIS has also updated its microbial testing schedule at poultry facilities and will soon begin posting more information online about individual companies’ food safety performance.

“Over the past seven years, USDA has put in place tighter and more strategic food safety measures than ever before for meat and poultry products. We have made strides in modernizing every aspect of food safety inspection, from company record keeping, to labeling requirements, to the way we perform testing in our labs,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “These new standards, in combination with greater transparency about poultry companies’ food safety performance and better testing procedures, will help prevent tens of thousands of foodborne illnesses every year, reaching our Healthy People 2020 goals.”

FSIS uses pathogen reduction performance standards to assess the food safety performance of establishments that prepare meat and poultry products. By making the standards for ground poultry tougher to meet, ground poultry products nationwide will have less contamination and therefore result in fewer foodborne illnesses. FSIS implemented performance standards for whole chickens in 1996 but has since learned that Salmonella levels increase as chicken is further processed into parts. Poultry parts like breasts, wings and others represent 80 percent of the chicken available for Americans to purchase. By creating a standard for chicken parts, and by performing regulatory testing at a point closer to the final product, FSIS can greatly reduce consumer exposure to Salmonella and Campylobacter.

“This approach to poultry inspection is based on science, supported by strong data, and will truly improve public health,” said USDA Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety Al Almanza. “The new performance standards will complement the many other proactive, prevention-based food policies that we’ve put in place in recent years to make America’s supply of meat and poultry safer to eat.”

For chicken parts, ground chicken, and ground turkey, FSIS is finalizing a pathogen reduction performance standard designed to achieve at least a 30 percent reduction in illnesses from Salmonella. For chicken parts and ground chicken, FSIS is finalizing a pathogen reduction performance standard designed to achieve at least a 32 percent reduction in illnesses from Campylobacter. Because FSIS has found the prevalence for Campylobacter in ground turkey to be already low, the reduction for this product is estimated to be 19 percent.

After these standards were proposed in early 2015, FSIS began to use routine sampling throughout the year rather than infrequent sampling on consecutive days to assess whether establishments’ processes are effectively addressing Salmonella and Campylobacter. Once establishments have completed a full set of testing under the new standards, the agency will also begin posting online which facilities pass, meet or fail the new standards.

An estimated 1.2 million foodborne illnesses are thought to be caused every year by Salmonella, with approximately one-third or 360,000 of those illnesses attributed to FSIS-regulated products. In 2013, the agency released a Salmonella Action Plan, which created a blueprint for the agency to address this pathogen of significant public health concern. Today’s announcement fulfills the major steps that FSIS had outlined in its plan.

Over the past six years, USDA has collaborated extensively with other federal partners to safeguard America’s food supply, prevent foodborne illnesses and improve consumers’ knowledge about the food they eat. USDA’s FSIS is working to strengthen federal food safety efforts and develop strategies that emphasize a three-dimensional approach to prevent foodborne illness: prioritizing prevention; strengthening surveillance and enforcement; and improving response and recovery.

Some of the other steps taken to improve the safety of meat and poultry include adopting a zero-tolerance policy for raw beef products containing six additional strains of shiga-toxin producing E. coli; ensuring that beef products that have been mechanically tenderized are labeled as such and include validated cooking instructions; implementing a new “test and hold” policy in 2012, which significantly reduces consumer exposure to unsafe meat products; and working closely with FDA and CDC to collectively form the Interagency Food Safety Analytics Collaboration (IFSAC), which focuses on projects related to foodborne illness source attribution and will try to improve the classification of foods implicated in foodborne disease outbreaks.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can also be accessed 24 hours a day at: www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

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Contact:
Office of Communications (202)720-4623

USDA’S FSIS: Home Maid Ravioli Company recalls 34,200 pounds of beef ravioli products due to misbranding

WASHINGTON, 2016-Jan-25 — /EPR Retail News/ — Home Maid Ravioli Company, Inc., a San Francisco, Calif. establishment, is recalling approximately 34,200 pounds of beef ravioli products due to misbranding and undeclared allergens, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The products contain whey, a known allergen, and pork, neither of which are declared on the product labels.  The products were also produced without the benefit of federal inspection.

The Home Maid ravioli items were produced on various dates between Sept. 20, 2015, and Jan. 15, 2016. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels(PDF only)]

  • 15-oz. cardboard boxed packages containing 54 pieces of “Ravioli.”
  • 12-oz. cardboard boxed packages of “Ravioli.”
  • 5-lb. bagged and boxed packages of “Ravioli with Sauce.”
  • 10-lb. bagged and boxed packages of “Ravioli with Sauce.”
  • 12-oz. cardboard boxed packages containing 24 pieces of “Deluxe Ravioli.”
  • 12-oz. cardboard boxed packages containing 24 pieces of “Jumbo Deluxe Ravioli.”
  • 12-oz. cardboard boxed packages containing 24 pieces of “Jumbo Ravioli.”
  • 12-oz. cardboard boxed packages containing 48 pieces of “Ravioli Seasoned w Sausage.”
  • 12-oz. cardboard boxed packages containing 24 pieces of “Ravioli Seasoned w Chicken.”
  • 12-oz. plastic containers of “Ravioli and Spaghetti Italian Style Sauce.”
  • 1-qt. plastic containers of “Italian Style Pasta Sauce.”
  • 1-gal. plastic containers of “Italian Style Pasta Sauce.”

These items were shipped to retail locations in California.

The firm operates under the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA); however the products subject to recall are amenable. The problem was discovered by FSIS during a review of products at a different federal plant.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers and media with questions about the recall can contact Richard Cresci, President, at (650) 588-0600.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

SOURCE: USDA

Congressional and Public Affairs
Kristen Booze
(202) 720-9113

 

USDA’S FSIS: Kayem Foods recalls 22,182 pounds of chicken sausage products due to misbranding

WASHINGTON, 2016-Jan-18 — /EPR Retail News/ — Kayem Foods Inc., a Chelsea, Mass. establishment, is recalling approximately 22,182 pounds of chicken sausage products due to misbranding, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The products bear the incorrect nutritional labeling information and are encased in pork casings, which are not declared on the label and may elicit allergic reactions in those allergic to pork proteins.

The chicken sausage items were produced on Nov. 4, 2015. The following product is subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF Only)]

  • 12-oz. vacuum-packed packages containing “al fresco SWEET APPLE CHICKEN SAUSAGE” bearing identification code “308 BW12 USE/FRZ BY FEB 7, 2016.”

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. P-7839” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered after the firm received consumer complaints that the product listed nutritional information for a different product, “al fresco Apple Maple Breakfast” sausages.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of this product. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Brenda Navaroli, Customer Service Manager, at 1-(800) 426-6100. Media with questions about the recall can contact Molly Kravitz, Public Relations Manager, at (617) 421-5431.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Congressional and Public Affairs
Katherine Scheidt
(202) 720-9113

USDA’s FSIS released final rule establishing inspection program for fish under the order Siluriformes

USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service Program Fulfills Requirement of the 2014 Farm Bill

WASHINGTON, 2015-11-27 — /EPR Retail News/ — Today, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) released a final rule establishing an inspection program for fish under the order Siluriformes, including catfish. The final rule, which applies to both domestically-raised and imported Siluriformes fish, was developed in order to implement provisions required by the 2014 Farm Bill. The rule will become effective in March 2016, 90 days after it publishes in the Federal Register.

“FSIS is committed to a smooth and gradual introduction to the new inspection program, which was mandated by the 2014 Farm Bill,” said Al Almanza, USDA Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety. “The agency will conduct extensive outreach to domestic industry and international partners so that they fully understand FSIS’ requirements prior to full implementation.”

The March 2016 effective date of the rule begins an 18-month transitional implementation period for both domestic and international producers. On the March 2016 effective date, all Siluriformes fish, including catfish, will be under the regulatory jurisdiction of FSIS and no longer regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Before the effective date of the final rule, countries currently exporting product to the United States that wish to continue doing so must provide a list of establishments that currently export, as well as written documentation of their regulatory authority and compliance with existing FDA import requirements.

During the transitional period, FSIS will conduct inspection during all hours of operation at domestic establishments that slaughter and process Siluriformes fish, similar to inspection provided at meat and poultry slaughter and processing facilities, while also providing the establishments with close guidance to ensure that they understand FSIS’ requirements. During this time, inspection program personnel will also be assigned to visit domestic Siluriformes fish processing establishments, at least once per quarter.

During the 18-month transitional period, FSIS will re-inspect and conduct species and residue sampling on imported Siluriformes fish shipments at least quarterly at U.S. import establishments on a random basis. Also, during the transitional period, countries wishing to continue exporting product to the United States after the transitional period must apply for an equivalency determination. Applications for equivalency must be complete by the end of the 18-month transitional period. FSIS will assist countries with their equivalency applications. Countries that submit completed documentation demonstrating equivalency by the 18-month deadline will be able to continue exporting to the United States while the agency conducts a full equivalency evaluation, which includes an on-site audit. If additional information is required, FSIS will request that the foreign country respond or resubmit complete equivalence documentation within 90 day of receiving FSIS’s request.

Following the18-month transitional period, inspection program personnel will continue to be assigned to conduct inspection during all hours of operation at domestic slaughter and processing establishments, and at least once per shift at processing-only establishments, which is similar to requirements for other food products that FSIS regulates. Also beginning at the end of the 18-month transitional period, FSIS will re-inspect and conduct species and residue tests on all incoming shipments.

USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service is the public health agency in the U.S. Department of Agriculture responsible for ensuring that the nation’s supply of meat, poultry and egg products is safe, wholesome, and correctly labeled and packaged. Regulations applying to the Siluriformes fish industry are adapted under the Federal Meat Inspection Act, as required by law under the 2014 Farm Bill.

The final rule can be found online at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/regulations/federal-register/interim-and-final-rules.

Over the past six years, USDA has collaborated extensively with other federal partners to safeguard America’s food supply, prevent foodborne illnesses and improve consumers’ knowledge about the food they eat. USDA’s FSIS is working to strengthen federal food safety efforts and develop strategies that emphasize a three-dimensional approach to prevent foodborne illness: prioritizing prevention; strengthening surveillance and enforcement; and improving response and recovery.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can also be accessed 24 hours a day at www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

SOURCE: USDA

USDA’s FSIS: Whole Foods Market establishment located in Everett, Mass recalls 234 pounds of curry chicken salad products

WASHINGTON, 2015-10-28 — /EPR Retail News/ — A Whole Foods Market establishment located in Everett, Mass. is recalling approximately 234 pounds of curry chicken salad products that may be adulterated with Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The chicken curry salad was packaged on Oct. 16, 2015, and was sold prepackaged, in salad bars, in store’s chef’s cases, and in sandwiches and wraps prepared in the stores. The following products are subject to recall: [Labels (PDF Only)]

  • Sold by weight “Curry Chicken Salad, Our Chef’s Own” bearing UPC Code # 285551.
  • Sold by weight “Curry Chicken Salad CC” bearing UPC Code # 261068.
  • Sold by weight “PPK Salad Chicken Curry” bearing UPC Code # 263142
  • 12 oz. “Curry Chicken Salad Wrap, Made Right Here” bearing UPC Code # 263144.
  • 7 oz. “Single Curry Chicken Salad Wrap, Made Right Here” bearing UPC Code # 263126.
  • 7 oz. “Curry Chicken Salad Rollup” bearing UPC Code # 265325.

These items have a sell by date of Oct. 23, 2015 and were shipped to a warehouse and retail locations in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island.

The problem was discovered when FSIS was notified of sample testing results performed by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

Consumption of food adulterated by L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating adulterated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the adulterated food.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be at home in consumers’ freezers or refrigerators.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

Related items, including the Whole Foods Class Deli Pasta Salad, have been listed for recall on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s website at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm469008.htm.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

FSIS advises all consumers to reheat ready-to-eat product until steaming hot.

Media and consumers with questions regarding the recall can contact Heather McCready, Public Relations Manager, at (617) 492-5500.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

 

PREPARING PRODUCT FOR SAFE CONSUMPTION
USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline
1-888-MPHOTLINE or visit
www.fsis.usda.gov

Wash hands with warm, soapy water before and after handling raw meat and poultry for at least 20 seconds. Wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot, soapy water. Immediately clean spills.

Do not eat hot dogs, luncheon meats, bologna or other deli meats unless reheated until steaming hot.

Do not eat refrigerated pate, meat spreads from a meat counter or smoked seafood found in the refrigerated section of the store. Foods that do not need refrigeration, like canned tuna and canned salmon, are safe to eat. Refrigerate after opening.

Do not drink raw (unpasteurized) milk and do not eat foods that have unpasteurized milk in them.

Do not eat salads made in the store, such as ham salad, chicken salad, egg salad, tuna salad or seafood salad.

Do not eat soft cheeses, such as Feta, queso blanco, queso fresco, Brie, Camembert cheeses, blue-veined cheeses and Panela, unless it is labeled as made with pasteurized milk.

Use precooked or ready-to-eat food as soon as you can. L. monocytogenes can grow in the refrigerator. The refrigerator should be

40º F or cooler and the freezer 0º F or colder Use an appliance thermometer to check the temperature of your refrigerator.

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

Congressional and Public Affairs
Julie Schwartz
(202) 720-9113